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Name:Flomax
Manufacturer:Lake Erie Medical Dba Quality Care Products
Category:Prescription Marketed Drugs


Flomax 0.4mg

FLOMAX  - tamsulosin hydrochloride capsule 
Lake Erie Medical DBA Quality Care Products

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Flomax 0.4mg

1  INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Flomax® (tamsulosin hydrochloride) capsules are indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) [see Clinical Studies (14)]. FLOMAX capsules are not indicated for the treatment of hypertension

2  DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg once daily is recommended as the dose for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of BPH. It should be administered approximately one-half hour following the same meal each day.

  For those patients who fail to respond to the 0.4 mg dose after 2 to 4 weeks of dosing, the dose of FLOMAX capsules can be increased to 0.8 mg once daily. FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg should not be used in combination with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (e.g., ketoconazole) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

If FLOMAX capsules administration is discontinued or interrupted for several days at either the 0.4 mg or 0.8 mg dose, therapy should be started again with the 0.4 mg once-daily dose.

3  DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Capsule: 0.4 mg, olive green and orange hard gelatin, imprinted on one side with Flomax 0.4 mg and on the other side with BI 58

4  CONTRAINDICATIONS

  FLOMAX capsules are contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to tamsulosin hydrochloride or any component of FLOMAX capsules. Reactions have included skin rash, urticaria, pruritus, angioedema, and respiratory symptoms [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

5  WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS5.1  Orthostasis

The signs and symptoms of orthostasis (postural hypotension, dizziness, and vertigo) were detected more frequently in FLOMAX capsule-treated patients than in placebo recipients. As with other alpha adrenergic blocking agents there is a potential risk of syncope [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Patients beginning treatment with FLOMAX capsules should be cautioned to avoid situations in which injury could result should syncope occur [see Patient Counseling Information (17.1)].

5.2  Drug Interactions

  Tamsulosin is extensively metabolized, mainly by CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg should not be used in combination with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (e.g., ketoconazole) [see Drug Interactions (7.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. FLOMAX capsules should be used with caution in combination with moderate inhibitors of CYP3A4 (e.g., erythromycin), in combination with strong (e.g., paroxetine) or moderate (e.g., terbinafine) inhibitors of CYP2D6, in patients known to be CYP2D6 poor metabolizers particularly at a dose higher than 0.4 mg (e.g., 0.8 mg) [see Drug Interactions (7.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

  FLOMAX capsules should be used with caution in combination with cimetidine, particularly at a dose higher than 0.4 mg (e.g., 0.8 mg) [see Drug Interactions (7.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

  FLOMAX capsules should not be used in combination with other alpha adrenergic blocking agents [see Drug Interactions (7.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

  Caution is advised when alpha adrenergic blocking agents including FLOMAX are co-administered with PDE5 inhibitors. Alpha-adrenergic blockers and PDE5 inhibitors are both vasodilators that can lower blood pressure. Concomitant use of these two drug classes can potentially cause symptomatic hypotension [see Drug Interactions (7.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Caution should be exercised with concomitant administration of warfarin and FLOMAX capsules [see Drug Interactions (7.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

5.3  Priapism

Rarely (probably less than 1 in 50,000 patients), tamsulosin, like other alpha1 antagonists, has been associated with priapism (persistent painful penile erection unrelated to sexual activity). Because this condition can lead to permanent impotence if not properly treated, patients must be advised about the seriousness of the condition [see Patient Counseling Information (17.2)].

5.4  Screening for Prostate Cancer

  Prostate cancer and BPH frequently co-exist; therefore, patients should be screened for the presence of prostate cancer prior to treatment with FLOMAX capsules and at regular intervals afterwards [see Patient Counseling Information (17.3)].

5.5  Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome

Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS) has been observed during cataract surgery in some patients treated with alpha1 blockers, including FLOMAX capsules [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)]. Most reports were in patients taking the alpha1 blocker when IFIS occurred, but in some cases, the alpha1 blocker had been stopped prior to surgery. In most of these cases, the alpha1 blocker had been stopped recently prior to surgery (2 to 14 days), but in a few cases, IFIS was reported after the patient had been off the alpha1 blocker for a longer period (5 weeks to 9 months). IFIS is a variant of small pupil syndrome and is characterized by the combination of a flaccid iris that billows in response to intraoperative irrigation currents, progressive intraoperative miosis despite preoperative dilation with standard mydriatic drugs and potential prolapse of the iris toward the phacoemulsification incisions. The patient's ophthalmologist should be prepared for possible modifications to their surgical technique, such as the utilization of iris hooks, iris dilator rings, or viscoelastic substances. The benefit of stopping alpha1 blocker therapy prior to cataract surgery has not been established.

5.6  Sulfa Allergy

In patients with sulfa allergy, allergic reaction to FLOMAX capsules has been rarely reported. If a patient reports a serious or life-threatening sulfa allergy, caution is warranted when administering FLOMAX capsules


6  ADVERSE REACTIONS6.1  Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reactions rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events has been ascertained from six short-term U.S. and European placebo-controlled clinical trials in which daily doses of 0.1 to 0.8 mg FLOMAX capsules were used. These studies evaluated safety in 1783 patients treated with FLOMAX capsules and 798 patients administered placebo. Table 1 summarizes the treatment-emergent adverse events that occurred in ≥2% of patients receiving either FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg or 0.8 mg and at an incidence numerically higher than that in the placebo group during two 13-week U.S. trials (US92-03A and US93-01) conducted in 1487 men.


6.2  Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of FLOMAX capsules. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Decisions to include these reactions in labeling are typically based on one or more of the following factors: (1) seriousness of the reaction, (2) frequency of reporting, or (3) strength of causal connection to FLOMAX capsules.

Allergic-type reactions such as skin rash, urticaria, pruritus, angioedema, and respiratory symptoms have been reported with positive rechallenge in some cases. Priapism has been reported rarely. Infrequent reports of palpitations, hypotension, skin desquamation, constipation, and vomiting have been received during the postmarketing period.

During cataract surgery, a variant of small pupil syndrome known as Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS) has been reported in association with alpha1 blocker therapy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

7  DRUG INTERACTIONS7.1  Cytochrome P450 InhibitionStrong and Moderate Inhibitors of CYP3A4 or CYP2D6

Tamsulosin is extensively metabolized, mainly by CYP3A4 and CYP2D6.

Concomitant treatment with ketoconazole (a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4) resulted in an increase in the Cmax and AUC of tamsulosin by a factor of 2.2 and 2.8, respectively [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The effects of concomitant administration of a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g., erythromycin) on the pharmacokinetics of FLOMAX have not been evaluated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Concomitant treatment with paroxetine (a strong inhibitor of CYP2D6) resulted in an increase in the Cmax and AUC of tamsulosin by a factor of 1.3 and 1.6, respectively [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. A similar increase in exposure is expected in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PM) as compared to extensive metabolizers (EM). Since CYP2D6 PMs cannot be readily identified and the potential for significant increase in tamsulosin exposure exists when FLOMAX 0.4 mg is co-administered with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors in CYP2D6 PMs, FLOMAX 0.4 mg capsules should not be used in combination with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (e.g., ketoconazole) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

The effects of concomitant administration of a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor (e.g., terbinafine) on the pharmacokinetics of FLOMAX have not been evaluated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

The effects of co-administration of both a CYP3A4 and a CYP2D6 inhibitor with FLOMAX capsules have not been evaluated. However, there is a potential for significant increase in tamsulosin exposure when FLOMAX 0.4 mg is co-administered with a combination of both CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 inhibitors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Cimetidine

Treatment with cimetidine resulted in a significant decrease (26%) in the clearance of tamsulosin hydrochloride, which resulted in a moderate increase in tamsulosin hydrochloride AUC (44%) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.2  Other Alpha Adrenergic Blocking Agents

The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between FLOMAX capsules and other alpha adrenergic blocking agents have not been determined; however, interactions between FLOMAX capsules and other alpha adrenergic blocking agents may be expected [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.3  PDE5 Inhibitors

Caution is advised when alpha adrenergic blocking agents including FLOMAX are co-administered with PDE5 inhibitors. Alpha-adrenergic blockers and PDE5 inhibitors are both vasodilators that can lower blood pressure. Concomitant use of these two drug classes can potentially cause symptomatic hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.4  Warfarin

A definitive drug-drug interaction study between tamsulosin hydrochloride and warfarin was not conducted. Results from limited in vitro and in vivo studies are inconclusive. Caution should be exercised with concomitant administration of warfarin and FLOMAX capsules [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.5  Nifedipine, Atenolol, Enalapril

Dosage adjustments are not necessary when FLOMAX capsules are administered concomitantly with nifedipine, atenolol, or enalapril [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.6  Digoxin and Theophylline

Dosage adjustments are not necessary when a FLOMAX capsule is administered concomitantly with digoxin or theophylline [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.7  Furosemide

FLOMAX capsules had no effect on the pharmacodynamics (excretion of electrolytes) of furosemide. While furosemide produced an 11% to 12% reduction in tamsulosin hydrochloride Cmax and AUC, these changes are expected to be clinically insignificant and do not require adjustment of the FLOMAX capsules dosage [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].


8  USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS8.1  PregnancyTeratogenic Effects, Pregnancy Category B.

Administration of tamsulosin hydrochloride to pregnant female rats at dose levels up to approximately 50 times the human therapeutic AUC exposure (300 mg/kg/day) revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus. Administration of tamsulosin hydrochloride to pregnant rabbits at dose levels up to 50 mg/kg/day produced no evidence of fetal harm. FLOMAX capsules are not indicated for use in women.

8.3  Nursing Mothers

FLOMAX capsules are not indicated for use in women.

8.4  Pediatric Use

FLOMAX capsules are not indicated for use in pediatric populations.

Efficacy and positive benefit/risk of tamsulosin hydrochloride was not demonstrated in two studies conducted in patients 2 years to 16 years of age with elevated detrusor leak point pressure (>40 cm H2O) associated with known neurological disorder (e.g., spina bifida). Patients in both studies were treated on a weight-based mg/kg schema (0.025 mg, 0.05 mg, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg, or 0.4 mg tamsulosin hydrochloride) for the reduction in detrusor leak point pressure below 40 cm H2O. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 14-week, pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy study in 161 patients, no statistically significant difference in the proportion of responders was observed between groups receiving tamsulosin hydrochloride and placebo. In an open-label, 12-month safety study, 87 patients were treated with tamsulosin hydrochloride. The most frequently reported adverse events (≥5%) from the pooled data of both studies were urinary tract infection, vomiting, pyrexia, headache, nasopharyngitis, cough, pharyngitis, influenza, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and constipation.

8.5  Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects (1783) in clinical studies of tamsulosin, 36% were 65 years of age and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and the other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].


10  OVERDOSAGE

Should overdosage of FLOMAX capsules lead to hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)], support of the cardiovascular system is of first importance. Restoration of blood pressure and normalization of heart rate may be accomplished by keeping the patient in the supine position. If this measure is inadequate, then administration of intravenous fluids should be considered. If necessary, vasopressors should then be used and renal function should be monitored and supported as needed. Laboratory data indicate that tamsulosin hydrochloride is 94% to 99% protein bound; therefore, dialysis is unlikely to be of benefit.

11  DESCRIPTION

Tamsulosin hydrochloride is an antagonist of alpha1A adrenoceptors in the prostate.

Tamsulosin hydrochloride is (-)-(R)-5-[2-[[2-(o-Ethoxyphenoxy) ethyl]amino]propyl]-2-methoxybenzenesulfonamide, monohydrochloride. Tamsulosin hydrochloride is a white crystalline powder that melts with decomposition at approximately 230°C. It is sparingly soluble in water and methanol, slightly soluble in glacial acetic acid and ethanol, and practically insoluble in ether

12  CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY12.1  Mechanism of Action

The symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are related to bladder outlet obstruction, which is comprised of two underlying components: static and dynamic. The static component is related to an increase in prostate size caused, in part, by a proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the prostatic stroma. However, the severity of BPH symptoms and the degree of urethral obstruction do not correlate well with the size of the prostate. The dynamic component is a function of an increase in smooth muscle tone in the prostate and bladder neck leading to constriction of the bladder outlet. Smooth muscle tone is mediated by the sympathetic nervous stimulation of alpha1 adrenoceptors, which are abundant in the prostate, prostatic capsule, prostatic urethra, and bladder neck. Blockade of these adrenoceptors can cause smooth muscles in the bladder neck and prostate to relax, resulting in an improvement in urine flow rate and a reduction in symptoms of BPH.

Tamsulosin, an alpha1 adrenoceptor blocking agent, exhibits selectivity for alpha1 receptors in the human prostate. At least three discrete alpha1 adrenoceptor subtypes have been identified: alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D; their distribution differs between human organs and tissue. Approximately 70% of the alpha1 receptors in the human prostate are of the alpha1A subtype.

FLOMAX capsules are not intended for use as an antihypertensive drug.

12.2  Pharmacodynamics

Urologic pharmacodynamic effects have been evaluated in neurologically impaired pediatric patients and in adults with BPH [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4) and Clinical Studies (14)].

12.3  Pharmacokinetics

The pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride have been evaluated in adult healthy volunteers and patients with BPH after single and/or multiple administration with doses ranging from 0.1 mg to 1 mg.

Absorption

Absorption of tamsulosin hydrochloride from FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg is essentially complete (>90%) following oral administration under fasting conditions. Tamsulosin hydrochloride exhibits linear kinetics following single and multiple dosing, with achievement of steady-state concentrations by the fifth day of once-a-day dosing.

Effect of Food

The time to maximum concentration (Tmax) is reached by 4 to 5 hours under fasting conditions and by 6 to 7 hours when FLOMAX capsules are administered with food. Taking FLOMAX capsules under fasted conditions results in a 30% increase in bioavailability (AUC) and 40% to 70% increase in peak concentrations (Cmax



14  CLINICAL STUDIES

Four placebo-controlled clinical studies and one active-controlled clinical study enrolled a total of 2296 patients (1003 received FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg once daily, 491 received FLOMAX capsules 0.8 mg once daily, and 802 were control patients) in the U.S. and Europe.

In the two U.S. placebo-controlled, double-blind, 13-week, multicenter studies [Study 1 (US92-03A) and Study 2 (US93-01)], 1486 men with the signs and symptoms of BPH were enrolled. In both studies, patients were randomized to either placebo, FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg once daily, or FLOMAX capsules 0.8 mg once daily. Patients in FLOMAX capsules 0.8 mg once-daily treatment groups received a dose of 0.4 mg once daily for one week before increasing to the 0.8 mg once-daily dose. The primary efficacy assessments included: 1) total American Urological Association (AUA) Symptom Score questionnaire, which evaluated irritative (frequency, urgency, and nocturia), and obstructive (hesitancy, incomplete emptying, intermittency, and weak stream) symptoms, where a decrease in score is consistent with improvement in symptoms; and 2) peak urine flow rate, where an increased peak urine flow rate value over baseline is consistent with decreased urinary obstruction.

Mean changes from baseline to Week 13 in total AUA Symptom Score were significantly greater for groups treated with FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg and 0.8 mg once daily compared to placebo in both U.S. studies (Table 3, Figures 2A and 2B). The changes from baseline to Week 13 in peak urine flow rate were also significantly greater for the FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg and 0.8 mg once-daily groups compared to placebo in Study 1, and for the FLOMAX capsules 0.8 mg once-daily group in Study 2 (Table 3, Figures 3A and 3B).


16  HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg are supplied in high density polyethylene bottles containing 100 hard gelatin capsules with olive green opaque cap and orange opaque body. The capsules are imprinted on one side with Flomax 0.4 mg and on the other side with BI 58.

FLOMAX capsules 0.4 mg, 100 capsules (NDC 0597-0058-01)

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15°C–30°C (59°F–86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Keep FLOMAX capsules and all medicines out of reach of children


17  PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

See FDA-Approved Patient Labeling (17.6).

17.1  Hypotension

Patients should be told about the possible occurrence of symptoms related to postural hypotension, such as dizziness, when taking FLOMAX capsules, and they should be cautioned about driving, operating machinery, or performing hazardous tasks [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

17.2  Priapism

Patients should be advised about the possibility of priapism as a result of treatment with FLOMAX capsules and other similar medications. Patients should be informed that this reaction is extremely rare, but if not brought to immediate medical attention, can lead to permanent erectile dysfunction (impotence) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

17.3  Screening for Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer and BPH frequently co-exist; therefore, patients should be screened for the presence of prostate cancer prior to treatment with FLOMAX capsules and at regular intervals afterwards [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

17.4  Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome

Patients considering cataract surgery should be advised to tell their ophthalmologist that they have taken FLOMAX capsules [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

17.5  Administration

Patients should be advised not to crush or chew the FLOMAX capsules.

17.6  FDA-approved Patient Labeling

Patient labeling is provided as a tear-off leaflet at the end of this prescribing information.

Marketed by:
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Ridgefield, CT 06877 USA
and
Astellas Pharma US, Inc.
Deerfield, IL 60015 USA

Manufactured by:
Astellas Pharma Inc.
Tokyo 103-8411 JAPAN
or
Astellas Pharma Technologies, Inc.
Norman, OK 73072 USA

Licensed from:

Astellas Pharma Inc.
Tokyo 103-8411, JAPAN

Flomax is a registered trademark of Astellas Pharma Inc.

©Copyright 2010, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

IT8004NA0410
PRT68
Rev: December 2009  Printed in USA

image of labelimage of label


FLOMAX 
flomax capsule
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:49999-881(NDC:00597-0058)
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
TAMSULOSIN HYDROCHLORIDE (TAMSULOSIN) TAMSULOSIN HYDROCHLORIDE 0.4 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
METHACRYLIC ACID - ETHYL ACRYLATE COPOLYMER (1:1) TYPE A  
CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE  
TRIACETIN  
TALC  
CALCIUM STEARATE  
FD&C BLUE NO. 2  
TITANIUM DIOXIDE  
FERRIC OXIDE RED  
GELATIN  
Product Characteristics
Color green (olive green) , orange Score no score
Shape CAPSULE (capsule) Size 19mm
Flavor Imprint Code flomax;0;4mg;BI;58
Contains     
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:49999-881-00 100 CAPSULE ( BOTTLE) in 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC None

Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
NDA NDA020579 05/13/2010

Labeler - Lake Erie Medical DBA Quality Care Products (831276758)
Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
Astellas Pharma Inc 177673068 relabel

Revised: 05/2010 Lake Erie Medical DBA Quality Care Products



Source: http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov
Reproduced with permission of U.S. National Library of Medicine


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