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Name:Aranesp
Manufacturer:Physicians Total Care, Inc.
Category:Prescription Marketed Drugs


ARANESP  - darbepoetin alfa injection, solution 
Physicians Total Care, Inc.

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WARNINGS: INCREASED MORTALITY, SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS, THROMBOEMBOLIC EVENTS, STROKE and INCREASED RISK OF TUMOR PROGRESSION OR RECURRENCE

Chronic Renal Failure:

  • In clinical studies, patients experienced greater risks for death, serious cardiovascular events, and stroke when administered erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) to target hemoglobin levels of 13 g/dL and above.
  • Individualize dosing to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL.

Cancer:

  • ESAs shortened overall survival and/or increased the risk of tumor progression or recurrence in some clinical studies in patients with breast, non-small cell lung, head and neck, lymphoid, and cervical cancers (see WARNINGS: Table 1 ).
  • To decrease these risks, as well as the risk of serious cardio- and thrombovascular events, use the lowest dose needed to avoid red blood cell transfusion.
  • Because of these risks, prescribers and hospitals must enroll in and comply with the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program to prescribe and/or dispense Aranesp® to patients with cancer. To enroll in the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program, visit www.esa-apprise.com or call 1-866-284-8089 for further assistance.
  • Use ESAs only for treatment of anemia due to concomitant myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • ESAs are not indicated for patients receiving myelosuppressive therapy when the anticipated outcome is cure.
  • Discontinue following the completion of a chemotherapy course.

(See WARNINGS: Increased Mortality, Serious Cardiovascular Events, Thromboembolic Events, and Stroke, WARNINGS: Increased Mortality and/or Increased Risk of Tumor Progression or Recurrence , INDICATIONS AND USAGE and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.)


DESCRIPTION

Aranesp® is an erythropoiesis stimulating protein, closely related to erythropoietin, that is produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by recombinant DNA technology. Aranesp® is a 165‑amino acid protein that differs from recombinant human erythropoietin in containing 5 N‑linked oligosaccharide chains, whereas recombinant human erythropoietin contains 3 chains.1 The two additional N-glycosylation sites result from amino acid substitutions in the erythropoietin peptide backbone. The additional carbohydrate chains increase the approximate molecular weight of the glycoprotein from 30,000 to 37,000 daltons. Aranesp® is formulated as a sterile, colorless, preservative-free protein solution for intravenous or subcutaneous administration.

Single-dose vials are available containing 25, 40, 60, 100, 150, 200, 300, or 500 mcg of Aranesp®.

Single-dose prefilled syringes and prefilled SureClick™ autoinjectors are available containing 25, 40, 60, 100, 150, 200, 300, or 500 mcg of Aranesp®. Each prefilled syringe is equipped with a needle guard that covers the needle during disposal.

Single-dose vials, prefilled syringes and autoinjectors are available in two formulations that contain excipients as follows:

 Polysorbate solution Each 1 mL contains 0.05 mg polysorbate 80, and is formulated at pH 6.2 ± 0.2 with 2.12 mg sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, 0.66 mg sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous, and 8.18 mg sodium chloride in Water for Injection, USP (to 1 mL). Albumin solution Each 1 mL contains 2.5 mg albumin (human), and is formulated at pH 6.0 ± 0.3 with 2.23 mg sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, 0.53 mg sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous, and 8.18 mg sodium chloride in Water for Injection, USP (to 1 mL).

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Aranesp® stimulates erythropoiesis by the same mechanism as endogenous erythropoietin. A primary growth factor for erythroid development, erythropoietin is produced in the kidney and released into the bloodstream in response to hypoxia. In responding to hypoxia, erythropoietin interacts with progenitor stem cells to increase red blood cell (RBC) production. Production of endogenous erythropoietin is impaired in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), and erythropoietin deficiency is the primary cause of their anemia. Increased hemoglobin levels are not generally observed until 2 to 6 weeks after initiating treatment with Aranesp® (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). In patients with cancer receiving concomitant chemotherapy, the etiology of anemia is multifactorial.

Pharmacokinetics Adult Patients

The pharmacokinetics of Aranesp® were studied in patients with CRF receiving or not receiving dialysis and cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

Following intravenous administration in CRF patients receiving dialysis, Aranesp® serum concentration-time profiles were biphasic, with a distribution half-life of approximately 1.4 hours and a mean terminal half-life of 21 hours. The terminal half-life of Aranesp® was approximately 3-fold longer than that of Epoetin alfa when administered intravenously.

Following subcutaneous administration of Aranesp® to CRF patients (receiving or not receiving dialysis), absorption was slow and peak concentrations occurred at 48 hours (range: 12 to 72 hours). In CRF patients receiving dialysis, the average half-life was 46 hours (range: 12 to 89 hours), and in CRF patients not receiving dialysis, the average half-life was 70 hours (range: 35 to 139 hours). Aranesp® apparent clearance was approximately 1.4 times faster on average in patients receiving dialysis compared to patients not receiving dialysis. The bioavailability of Aranesp® in CRF patients receiving dialysis after subcutaneous administration was 37% (range: 30% to 50%).

Following the first subcutaneous dose of 6.75 mcg/kg (equivalent to 500 mcg for a 74-kg patient) in patients with cancer, the mean terminal half-life was 74 hours (range: 24 to 144 hours). Peak concentrations were observed at 90 hours (range: 71 to 123 hours) after a dose of 2.25 mcg/kg, and 71 hours (range: 28 to 120 hours) after a dose of 6.75 mcg/kg. When administered on a once every 3 week schedule, 48-hour post-dose Aranesp® levels after the fourth dose were similar to those after the first dose.

Over the dose range of 0.45 to 4.5 mcg/kg Aranesp® administered intravenously or subcutaneously on a once weekly schedule and 4.5 to 15 mcg/kg administered subcutaneously on a once every 3 week schedule, systemic exposure was approximately proportional to dose. No evidence of accumulation was observed beyond an expected < 2-fold increase in blood levels when compared to the initial dose.

Pediatric Patients

Aranesp® pharmacokinetics were studied in 12 pediatric CRF patients (age 3-16 years) receiving or not receiving dialysis. Following a single intravenous or subcutaneous Aranesp® dose, Cmax and half-life were similar to those obtained in adult CRF patients on dialysis. Following a single subcutaneous dose, the average bioavailability was 54% (range: 32% to 70%), which was higher than that obtained in adult CRF patients on dialysis.

CLINICAL STUDIES

The safety and effectiveness of Aranesp® have been assessed in a number of multicenter studies. Two studies evaluated the safety and efficacy of Aranesp® for the correction of anemia in adult patients with CRF, and three studies (2 in adults and 1 in pediatric patients) assessed the ability of Aranesp® to maintain hemoglobin concentrations in patients with CRF who had been receiving other recombinant erythropoietins.

De Novo Use of Aranesp®

Once Weekly Aranesp®  Starting Dose

In two open-label studies, Aranesp® or Epoetin alfa was administered for the correction of anemia in CRF patients who had not been receiving prior treatment with exogenous erythropoietin. Study N1 evaluated CRF patients receiving dialysis; Study N2 evaluated patients not requiring dialysis. In both studies, the starting dose of Aranesp® was 0.45 mcg/kg administered once weekly. The starting dose of Epoetin alfa was 50 Units/kg 3 times weekly in Study N1 and 50 Units/kg twice weekly in Study N2. When necessary, dosage adjustments were instituted to maintain hemoglobin in the study target range of 11 to 13 g/dL. (Note: The recommended hemoglobin target is lower than the target range of these studies. See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION for recommended clinical hemoglobin target.) The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients who experienced at least a 1 g/dL increase in hemoglobin concentration to a level of at least 11 g/dL by 20 weeks (Study N1) or 24 weeks (Study N2). The studies were designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of Aranesp® but not to support conclusions regarding comparisons between the two products.

In Study N1, the hemoglobin target was achieved by 72% (95% CI: 62%, 81%) of the 90 patients treated with Aranesp® and 84% (95% CI: 66%, 95%) of the 31 patients treated with Epoetin alfa. The mean increase in hemoglobin over the initial 4 weeks of Aranesp® treatment was 1.1 g/dL (95% CI: 0.82 g/dL, 1.37 g/dL).

In Study N2, the primary efficacy endpoint was achieved by 93% (95% CI: 87%, 97%) of the 129 patients treated with Aranesp® and 92% (95% CI: 78%, 98%) of the 37 patients treated with Epoetin alfa. The mean increase in hemoglobin from baseline through the initial 4 weeks of Aranesp® treatment was 1.38 g/dL (95% CI: 1.21 g/dL, 1.55 g/dL).

Once Every 2 Week Aranesp®  Starting Dose

In two single arm studies (N3 and N4), Aranesp® was administered for the correction of anemia in CRF patients not receiving dialysis. In both studies, the starting dose of Aranesp® was 0.75 mcg/kg administered once every 2 weeks.

In Study N3 (study duration of 18 weeks), the hemoglobin goal (hemoglobin concentration ≥ 11 g/dL) was achieved by 92% (95% CI: 86%, 96%) of the 128 patients treated with Aranesp®.

In Study N4 (study duration of 24 weeks), the hemoglobin goal (hemoglobin concentration of 11-13 g/dL) was achieved by 85% (95% CI: 77%, 93%) of the 75 patients treated with Aranesp®.

Conversion From Other Recombinant Erythropoietins

Two adult studies (N5 and N6) and one pediatric study (N7) were conducted in patients with CRF who had been receiving other recombinant erythropoietins. The studies compared the abilities of Aranesp® and other erythropoietins to maintain hemoglobin concentrations within a study target range of 9 to 13 g/dL in adults and 10 to 12.5 g/dL in pediatric patients. (Note: The recommended hemoglobin target is lower than the target range of these studies. See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION for recommended clinical hemoglobin target.) CRF patients who had been receiving stable doses of other recombinant erythropoietins were randomized to Aranesp®, or to continue with their prior erythropoietin at the previous dose and schedule. For patients randomized to Aranesp®, the initial weekly dose was determined on the basis of the previous total weekly dose of recombinant erythropoietin.

Adult Patients

Study N5 was a double-blind study conducted in North America, in which 169 hemodialysis patients were randomized to treatment with Aranesp® and 338 patients continued on Epoetin alfa. Study N6 was an open-label study conducted in Europe and Australia in which 347 patients were randomized to treatment with Aranesp® and 175 patients were randomized to continue on Epoetin alfa or Epoetin beta. Of the 347 patients randomized to Aranesp®, 92% were receiving hemodialysis and 8% were receiving peritoneal dialysis.

In Study N5, a median weekly dose of 0.53 mcg/kg Aranesp® (25th, 75th percentiles: 0.30, 0.93 mcg/kg) was required to maintain hemoglobin in the study target range. In Study N6, a median weekly dose of 0.41 mcg/kg Aranesp® (25th, 75th percentiles: 0.26, 0.65 mcg/kg) was required to maintain hemoglobin in the study target range.

Pediatric Patients

Study N7 was an open-label, randomized study, conducted in the United States in pediatric patients from 1 to 18 years of age with CRF receiving or not receiving dialysis. Patients that were stable on Epoetin alfa were randomized to receive either darbepoetin alfa (n = 82) administered once weekly (subcutaneously or intravenously) or to continue receiving Epoetin alfa (n = 42) at the current dose, schedule, and route of administration. A median weekly dose of 0.41 mcg/kg Aranesp® (25th, 75th percentiles: 0.25, 0.82 mcg/kg) was required to maintain hemoglobin in the study target range.

Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

Efficacy in patients with anemia due to concomitant chemotherapy was demonstrated based on reduction in the requirement for RBC transfusions.

Once Weekly Dosing

The safety and effectiveness of Aranesp® in reducing the requirement for RBC transfusions in patients undergoing chemotherapy was assessed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multinational study (C1). This study was conducted in anemic (Hgb ≤ 11 g/dL) patients with advanced, small cell or non-small cell lung cancer, who received a platinum-containing chemotherapy regimen. Patients were randomized to receive Aranesp® 2.25 mcg/kg (n = 156) or placebo (n = 158) administered as a single weekly SC injection for up to 12 weeks. The dose was escalated to 4.5 mcg/kg/week at week 6, in subjects with an inadequate response to treatment, defined as less than 1 g/dL hemoglobin increase. There were 67 patients in the Aranesp® arm who had their dose increased from 2.25 to 4.5 mcg/kg/week, at any time during the treatment period.

Efficacy was determined by a reduction in the proportion of patients who were transfused over the 12-week treatment period. A significantly lower proportion of patients in the Aranesp® arm, 26% (95% CI: 20%, 33%) required transfusion compared to 60% (95% CI: 52%, 68%) in the placebo arm (Kaplan-Meier estimate of proportion; p < 0.001 by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test). Of the 67 patients who received a dose increase, 28% had a 2 g/dL increase in hemoglobin over baseline, generally occurring between weeks 8 to 13. Of the 89 patients who did not receive a dose increase, 69% had a 2 g/dL increase in hemoglobin over baseline, generally occurring between weeks 6 to 13. On-study deaths occurred in 14% (22/156) of patients treated with Aranesp® and 12% (19/158) of the placebo-treated patients.

Once Every 3 Week Dosing

The safety and effectiveness of once every 3 week Aranesp® therapy in reducing the requirement for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in patients undergoing chemotherapy was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, multinational study (C2). This study was conducted in anemic (Hgb < 11 g/dL) patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving multicycle chemotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive Aranesp® at 500 mcg once every 3 weeks (n = 353) or 2.25 mcg/kg (n = 352) administered weekly as a subcutaneous injection for up to 15 weeks. In both groups, the dose was reduced by 40% of the previous dose (e.g., for first dose reduction, to 300 mcg in the once every 3 week group and 1.35 mcg/kg in the once weekly group) if hemoglobin increased by more than 1 g/dL in a 14-day period. Study drug was withheld if hemoglobin exceeded 13 g/dL. In the once every 3 week group, 254 patients (72%) required dose reductions (median time to first reduction at 6 weeks). In the once weekly group, 263 patients (75%) required dose reductions (median time to first reduction at 5 weeks).

Efficacy was determined by a comparison of the Kaplan-Meier estimates of the proportion of patients who received at least one RBC transfusion between day 29 and the end of treatment. Three hundred thirty- five patients in the once every 3 week group and 337 patients in the once weekly group remained on study through or beyond day 29 and were evaluated for efficacy. Twenty-seven percent (95% CI: 22%, 32%) of patients in the once every 3 week group and 34% (95% CI: 29%, 39%) in the weekly group required a RBC transfusion. The observed difference in the transfusion rates (once every 3 week-once weekly) was -6.7% (95% CI: -13.8%, 0.4%).

Lack of Efficacy in Improving Survival

Study C3 was conducted in patients required to have a hemoglobin concentration > 9 g/dL and < 13 g/dL with previously untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) receiving platinum and etoposide chemotherapy.  Randomization was stratified by region (Western Europe, Australia/North America, and rest of world), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (0 or 1 vs. 2), and lactate dehydrogenase (below vs. above the upper limit of normal).  Patients were randomized to receive Aranesp® (n = 298) at a dose of 300 mcg once weekly for the first 4 weeks, followed by 300 mcg once every 3 weeks for the remainder of the treatment period or placebo (n = 298).

This study was designed to detect a prolongation in overall survival (from a median of 9 months to a median of 12 months). For the final analysis, there was no evidence of improved survival (p = 0.43, log-rank test).

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Anemia With Chronic Renal Failure

Aranesp® is indicated for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure, including patients on dialysis and patients not on dialysis.

Anemia With Non-Myeloid Malignancies Due to Chemotherapy

Aranesp® is indicated for the treatment of anemia due to the effect of concomitantly administered chemotherapy based on studies that have shown a reduction in the need for RBC transfusions in patients with metastatic, non-myeloid malignancies. Studies to determine whether Aranesp® increases mortality or decreases progression-free/recurrence-free survival are ongoing.

  • Aranesp® is not indicated for use in patients receiving hormonal agents, therapeutic biologic products, or radiotherapy unless receiving concomitant myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • Aranesp® is not indicated for patients receiving myelosuppressive therapy when the anticipated outcome is cure due to the absence of studies that adequately characterize the impact of Aranesp® on progression-free and overall survival (see WARNINGS: Increased Mortality and/or Increased Risk of Tumor Progression or Recurrence).
  • Aranesp® use has not been demonstrated in controlled clinical trials to improve symptoms of anemia, quality of life, fatigue, or patient well-being.

CONTRIANDICATIONS

Aranesp® is contraindicated in patients with:

  • uncontrolled hypertension
  • known hypersensitivity to the active substance or any of the excipients

WARNINGS

Increased Mortality, Serious Cardiovascular Events, Thromboembolic Events, and Stroke

Patients with chronic renal failure experienced greater risks for death, serious cardiovascular events, and stroke when administered erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) to target hemoglobin levels of 13 g/dL and above in clinical studies. Patients with chronic renal failure and an insufficient hemoglobin response to ESA therapy may be at even greater risk for cardiovascular events and mortality than other patients. Aranesp® and other ESAs increased the risks for death and serious cardiovascular events in controlled clinical trials of patients with cancer. These events included myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and hemodialysis vascular access thrombosis. A rate of hemoglobin rise of > 1 g/dL over 2 weeks may contribute to these risks.

In a randomized prospective trial, 1432 anemic chronic renal failure patients who were not undergoing dialysis were assigned to Epoetin alfa (rHuEPO) treatment targeting a maintenance hemoglobin concentration of 13.5 g/dL or 11.3 g/dL. A major cardiovascular event (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for congestive heart failure) occurred among 125 (18%) of the 715 patients in the higher hemoglobin group compared to 97 (14%) among the 717 patients in the lower hemoglobin group [Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7, p = 0.03].2

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 4038 patients, there was an increased risk of stroke when Aranesp® was administered to patients with anemia, type 2 diabetes, and CRF who were not on dialysis. Patients were randomized to Aranesp® treatment targeted to a hemoglobin level of 13 g/dL or to placebo. Placebo patients received Aranesp® only if their hemoglobin levels were less than 9 g/dL. A total of 101 patients receiving Aranesp® experienced stroke compared to 53 patients receiving placebo (5% vs. 2.6%; HR 1.92, 95% CI: 1.38, 2.68; p < 0.001).

Increased risk for serious cardiovascular events was also reported from a randomized, prospective trial of 1265 hemodialysis patients with clinically evident cardiac disease (ischemic heart disease or congestive heart failure). In this trial, patients were assigned to Epoetin alfa treatment targeted to a maintenance hemoglobin of either 14 ± 1 g/dL or 10 ± 1 g/dL.3 Higher mortality (35% vs. 29%) was observed in the 634 patients randomized to a target hemoglobin of 14 g/dL than in the 631 patients assigned a target hemoglobin of 10 g/dL. The reason for the increased mortality observed in this study is unknown; however, the incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction, vascular access thrombosis, and other thrombotic events was also higher in the group randomized to a target hemoglobin of 14 g/dL.

An increased incidence of thrombotic events has also been observed in patients with cancer treated with erythropoietic agents. In patients with cancer who received Aranesp®, pulmonary emboli, thrombophlebitis, and thrombosis occurred more frequently than in placebo controls (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy , Table 5 ).

In a randomized controlled study (referred to as Cancer Study 1 - the ‘BEST’ study) with another ESA in 939 women with metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy, patients received either weekly Epoetin alfa or placebo for up to a year. This study was designed to show that survival was superior when an ESA was administered to prevent anemia (maintain hemoglobin levels between 12 and 14 g/dL or hematocrit between 36% and 42%). The study was terminated prematurely when interim results demonstrated that a higher mortality at 4 months (8.7% vs. 3.4%) and a higher rate of fatal thrombotic events (1.1% vs. 0.2%) in the first 4 months of the study were observed among patients treated with Epoetin alfa. Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates, at the time of study termination, the 12-month survival was lower in the Epoetin alfa group than in the placebo group (70% vs. 76%; HR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.75, p = 0.012).4

A systematic review of 57 randomized controlled trials (including Cancer Studies 1 and 5 - the 'BEST' and 'ENHANCE' studies) evaluating 9353 patients with cancer compared ESAs plus RBC transfusion with RBC transfusion alone for prophylaxis or treatment of anemia in cancer patients with or without concurrent antineoplastic therapy. An increased relative risk (RR) of thromboembolic events (RR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.35, 2.06; 35 trials and 6769 patients) was observed in ESA-treated patients. An overall survival hazard ratio of 1.08 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.18; 42 trials and 8167 patients) was observed in ESA-treated patients.5

An increased incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients receiving Epoetin alfa undergoing surgical orthopedic procedures has been observed. In a randomized controlled study (referred to as the ‘SPINE’ study), 681 adult patients, not receiving prophylactic anticoagulation and undergoing spinal surgery, received Epoetin alfa and standard of care (SOC) treatment, or SOC treatment alone. Preliminary analysis showed a higher incidence of DVT, determined by either Color Flow Duplex Imaging or by clinical symptoms, in the Epoetin alfa group [16 patients (4.7%)] compared to the SOC group [7 patients (2.1%)]. In addition, 12 patients in the Epoetin alfa group and 7 patients in the SOC group had other thrombotic vascular events.

Increased mortality was observed in a randomized placebo-controlled study of Epoetin alfa in adult patients who were undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (7 deaths in 126 patients randomized to Epoetin alfa versus no deaths among 56 patients receiving placebo). Four of these deaths occurred during the period of study drug administration and all four deaths were associated with thrombotic events.

Aranesp® is not approved for reduction in allogeneic RBC transfusions in patients scheduled for surgical procedures.

Increased Mortality and/or Increased Risk of Tumor Progression or Recurrence

Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents resulted in decreased locoregional control/progression-free survival and/or overall survival (see Table 1). These findings were observed in studies of patients with advanced head and neck cancer receiving radiation therapy (Cancer Studies 5 and 6), in patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer (Cancer Study 1) or lymphoid malignancy (Cancer Study 2), and in patients with non-small cell lung cancer or various malignancies who were not receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy (Cancer Studies 7 and 8).

Table 1: Randomized, Controlled Trials with Decreased Survival and/or Decreased Locoregional Control
Study / Tumor / (n) Hemoglobin Target

Achieved

Hemoglobin

(Median

Q1,Q3)
Primary Endpoint Adverse Outcome for ESA-containing Arm
Chemotherapy

Cancer Study 1

Metastatic breast cancer

(n=939)

12-14 g/dL

12.9 g/dL

12.2, 13.3 g/dL
12-month overall survival

Decreased 12-month survival

Cancer Study 2

Lymphoid malignancy

(n=344)

13-15 g/dL (M)

13-14 g/dL (F)

11.0 g/dL

9.8, 12.1 g/dL
Proportion of patients achieving a hemoglobin response

Decreased overall survival

Cancer Study 3

Early breast cancer

(n=733)
12.5-13 g/dL

13.1 g/dL

12.5, 13.7 g/dL
Relapse-free and overall survival Decreased 3 yr. relapse-free and overall survival

Cancer Study 4

Cervical Cancer

(n=114)
12-14 g/dL

12.7 g/dL

12.1, 13.3 g/dL
Progression-free and overall survival and locoregional control Decreased 3 yr. progression-free and overall survival and locoregional control
Radiotherapy Alone

Cancer Study 5

Head and neck cancer

(n=351)

>15 g/dL (M)

>14 g/dL (F)
Not available Locoregional progression-free survival

Decreased 5-year locoregional progression-free survival

Decreased overall survival

Cancer Study 6

Head and neck cancer

(n=522)

14-15.5 g/dL Not available Locoregional disease control Decreased locoregional disease control
No Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy

Cancer Study 7

Non-small cell lung cancer

(n=70)

 

12-14 g/dL Not available Quality of life

Decreased overall survival

Cancer Study 8

Non-myeloid malignancy

(n=989)

 

12-13 g/dL

10.6 g/dL

9.4, 11.8 g/dL
RBC transfusions

Decreased overall survival

Decreased overall survival:

Cancer Study 1 (the ‘BEST’ study) was previously described (see WARNINGS: Increased Mortality, Serious Cardiovascular Events, Thromboembolic Events, and Stroke). Mortality at 4 months (8.7% vs. 3.4%) was significantly higher in the Epoetin alfa arm. The most common investigator-attributed cause of death within the first 4 months was disease progression; 28 of 41 deaths in the Epoetin alfa arm and 13 of 16 deaths in the placebo arm were attributed to disease progression. Investigator assessed time to tumor progression was not different between the two groups. Survival at 12 months was significantly lower in the Epoetin alfa arm (70% vs. 76%, HR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.75; p = 0.012).4

Cancer Study 2 was a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized (Aranesp® vs. placebo) study conducted in 344 anemic patients with lymphoid malignancy receiving chemotherapy.  With a median follow-up of 29 months, overall mortality rates were significantly higher among patients randomized to Aranesp® as compared to placebo (HR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.82).

Cancer Study 7 was a Phase 3, multicenter, randomized (Epoetin alfa vs. placebo), double-blind study, in which patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer receiving only palliative radiotherapy or no active therapy were treated with Epoetin alfa to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels between 12 and 14 g/dL. Following an interim analysis of 70 of 300 patients planned, a significant difference in survival in favor of the patients on the placebo arm of the trial was observed (median survival 63 vs. 129 days; HR 1.84; p = 0.04).

Cancer Study 8 was a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized (Aranesp® vs. placebo), 16-week study in 989 anemic patients with active malignant disease, neither receiving nor planning to receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy. There was no evidence of a statistically significant reduction in proportion of patients receiving RBC transfusions. The median survival was shorter in the Aranesp® treatment group (8 months) compared with the placebo group (10.8 months); HR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.57.

Decreased progression-free survival and overall survival:

Cancer Study 3 (the ‘PREPARE’ study) was a randomized controlled study in which Aranesp® was administered to prevent anemia conducted in 733 women receiving neo-adjuvant breast cancer treatment. After a median follow-up of approximately 3 years the survival rate (86% vs. 90%, HR 1.42, 95% CI: 0.93, 2.18) and relapse-free survival rate were lower (72% vs. 78%, HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.79) in the Aranesp®-treated arm compared to the control arm.

Cancer Study 4 (protocol GOG 191) was a randomized controlled study that enrolled 114 of a planned 460 cervical cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive Epoetin alfa to maintain hemoglobin between 12 and 14 g/dL or to transfusion support as needed. The study was terminated prematurely due to an increase in thromboembolic events in Epoetin alfa-treated patients compared to control (19% vs. 9%). Both local recurrence (21% vs. 20%) and distant recurrence (12% vs. 7%) were more frequent in Epoetin alfa-treated patients compared to control. Progression-free survival at 3 years was lower in the Epoetin alfa-treated group compared to control (59% vs. 62%, HR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.58, 1.91). Overall survival at 3 years was lower in the Epoetin alfa-treated group compared to control (61% vs. 71%, HR 1.28, 95% CI: 0.68, 2.42).

Cancer Study 5 (the ‘ENHANCE’ study) was a randomized controlled study in 351 head and neck cancer patients where Epoetin beta or placebo was administered to achieve target hemoglobins of 14 and 15 g/dL for women and men, respectively. Locoregional progression-free survival was significantly shorter in patients receiving Epoetin beta (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.22, 2.14, p = 0.0008) with a median of 406 days Epoetin beta vs. 745 days placebo. Overall survival was significantly shorter in patients receiving Epoetin beta (HR 1.39, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.84; p = 0.02).

Decreased locoregional control:

Cancer Study 6 (DAHANCA 10) was conducted in 522 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck receiving radiation therapy randomized to Aranesp® with radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. An interim analysis on 484 patients demonstrated that locoregional control at 5 years was significantly shorter in patients receiving Aranesp® (RR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.96; p = 0.02). Overall survival was shorter in patients receiving Aranesp® (RR 1.28, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.68; p = 0.08).

ESA APPRISE Oncology Program

Prescribers and hospitals must enroll in and comply with the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program to prescribe and/or dispense Aranesp® to patients with cancer. To enroll, visit www.esa-apprise.com or call 1-866-284-8089 for further assistance. Additionally, prescribers and patients must provide written acknowledgment of a discussion of the risks associated with Aranesp®.

Hypertension

Patients with uncontrolled hypertension should not be treated with Aranesp®; blood pressure should be controlled adequately before initiation of therapy. Blood pressure may rise during treatment of anemia with Aranesp® or Epoetin alfa. In Aranesp® clinical trials, approximately 40% of patients with CRF required initiation or intensification of antihypertensive therapy during the early phase of treatment when the hemoglobin was increasing. Hypertensive encephalopathy and seizures have been observed in patients with CRF treated with Aranesp® or Epoetin alfa.

Special care should be taken to closely monitor and control blood pressure in patients treated with Aranesp®. During Aranesp® therapy, patients should be advised of the importance of compliance with antihypertensive therapy and dietary restrictions. If blood pressure is difficult to control by pharmacologic or dietary measures, the dose of Aranesp® should be reduced or withheld (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). A clinically significant decrease in hemoglobin may not be observed for several weeks.

Seizures

Seizures have occurred in patients with CRF participating in clinical trials of Aranesp® and Epoetin alfa. During the first several months of therapy, blood pressure and the presence of premonitory neurologic symptoms should be monitored closely. While the relationship between seizures and the rate of rise of hemoglobin is uncertain, it is recommended that the dose of Aranesp® be decreased if the hemoglobin increase exceeds 1 g/dL in any 2‑week period.

Pure Red Cell Aplasia

Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and of severe anemia, with or without other cytopenias, associated with neutralizing antibodies to erythropoietin have been reported in patients treated with Aranesp®. This has been reported predominantly in patients with CRF receiving ESAs by subcutaneous administration. PRCA has also been reported in patients receiving ESAs while undergoing treatment for hepatitis C with interferon and ribavirin. Any patient who develops a sudden loss of response to Aranesp®, accompanied by severe anemia and low reticulocyte count, should be evaluated for the etiology of loss of effect, including the presence of neutralizing antibodies to erythropoietin (see PRECAUTIONS: Lack or Loss of Response to Aranesp®). If anti-erythropoietin antibody-associated anemia is suspected, withhold Aranesp® and other ESAs. Contact Amgen (1-800-77AMGEN) to perform assays for binding and neutralizing antibodies. Aranesp® should be permanently discontinued in patients with antibody-mediated anemia. Patients should not be switched to other ESAs as antibodies may cross-react (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Immunogenicity).

Albumin (Human)

Aranesp® is supplied in two formulations with different excipients, one containing polysorbate 80 and another containing albumin (human), a derivative of human blood (see DESCRIPTION). Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, Aranesp® formulated with albumin carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases. A theoretical risk for transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) also is considered extremely remote. No cases of transmission of viral diseases or CJD have ever been identified for albumin.

PRECAUTIONS

General

The safety and efficacy of Aranesp® therapy have not been established in patients with underlying hematologic diseases (e.g., hemolytic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, porphyria).

The needle cover of the prefilled syringe contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex), which may cause allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to latex.

Lack or Loss of Response to Aranesp®

A lack of response or failure to maintain a hemoglobin response with Aranesp® doses within the recommended dosing range should prompt a search for causative factors. Deficiencies of folic acid, iron, or vitamin B12 should be excluded or corrected. Depending on the clinical setting, intercurrent infections, inflammatory or malignant processes, osteofibrosis cystica, occult blood loss, hemolysis, severe aluminum toxicity, and bone marrow fibrosis may compromise an erythropoietic response. In the absence of another etiology, the patient should be evaluated for evidence of PRCA and sera should be tested for the presence of antibodies to erythropoietin (see WARNINGS: Pure Red Cell Aplasia). See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: Chronic Renal Failure Patients , Dose Adjustment for management of patients with an insufficient hemoglobin response to Aranesp® therapy.

Hematology

Sufficient time should be allowed to determine a patient’s responsiveness to a dosage of Aranesp® before adjusting the dose. Because of the time required for erythropoiesis and the RBC half-life, an interval of 2 to 6 weeks may occur between the time of a dose adjustment (initiation, increase, decrease, or discontinuation) and a significant change in hemoglobin.

In order to prevent the hemoglobin from exceeding the recommended target range (10 to 12 g/dL) or rising too rapidly (greater than 1 g/dL in 2 weeks), the guidelines for dose and frequency of dose adjustments should be followed (see WARNINGS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Allergic Reactions

There have been rare reports of potentially serious allergic reactions, including skin rash and urticaria, associated with Aranesp®. Symptoms have recurred with rechallenge, suggesting a causal relationship exists in some instances. If a serious allergic or anaphylactic reaction occurs, Aranesp® should be immediately and permanently discontinued and appropriate therapy should be administered.

Patients with CRF Not Requiring Dialysis

Patients with CRF not yet requiring dialysis may require lower maintenance doses of Aranesp® than patients receiving dialysis. Though CRF patients not on dialysis generally receive less frequent monitoring of blood pressure and laboratory parameters than dialysis patients, CRF patients not on dialysis may be more responsive to the effects of Aranesp®, and require judicious monitoring of blood pressure and hemoglobin. Renal function and fluid and electrolyte balance should also be closely monitored.

Patients Transitioning to Dialysis

During the transition period onto dialysis, hemoglobin and blood pressure should be monitored carefully and patients may need to have their maintenance doses adjusted to maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: Maintenance Dose).

Dialysis Management

Therapy with Aranesp® results in an increase in RBCs and a decrease in plasma volume, which could reduce dialysis efficiency; patients who are marginally dialyzed may require adjustments in their dialysis prescription.

Laboratory Tests

After initiation of Aranesp® therapy, the hemoglobin should be determined weekly until it has stabilized and the maintenance dose has been established (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). After a dose adjustment, the hemoglobin should be determined weekly for at least 4 weeks, until it has been determined that the hemoglobin has stabilized in response to the dose change. The hemoglobin should then be monitored at regular intervals.

In order to ensure effective erythropoiesis, iron status should be evaluated for all patients before and during treatment, as the majority of patients will eventually require supplemental iron therapy. Supplemental iron therapy is recommended for all patients whose serum ferritin is below 100 mcg/L or whose serum transferrin saturation is below 20%.

Information for Patients

Patients should be informed of the increased risks of mortality, serious cardiovascular events, thromboembolic events, and increased risk of tumor progression or recurrence (see WARNINGS). Patients should be informed of the possible side effects of Aranesp® and be instructed to report them to the prescribing physician. Patients should be informed of the signs and symptoms of allergic drug reactions and be advised of appropriate actions. Patients should be counseled on the importance of compliance with their Aranesp® treatment, dietary and dialysis prescriptions, and the importance of judicious monitoring of blood pressure and hemoglobin concentration should be stressed.

In those rare cases where it is determined that a patient can safely and effectively administer Aranesp® at home, appropriate instruction on the proper use of Aranesp® should be provided for patients and their caregivers. Patients should be instructed to read the Aranesp® Medication Guide and Patient Instructions for Use and should be informed that the Medication Guide is not a disclosure of all possible side effects. Patients and caregivers should also be cautioned against the reuse of needles, syringes, prefilled SureClick™ autoinjectors, or drug product, and be thoroughly instructed in their proper disposal. A puncture-resistant container for the disposal of used syringes, autoinjectors, and needles should be made available to the patient. Patients should be informed that the needle cover on the prefilled syringe contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex), which should not be handled by persons sensitive to latex.

Drug Interactions

No formal drug interaction studies of Aranesp® have been performed.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenicity: The carcinogenic potential of Aranesp® has not been evaluated in long-term animal studies. Aranesp® did not alter the proliferative response of non-hematological cells in vitro or in vivo. In toxicity studies of approximately 6 months duration in rats and dogs, no tumorigenic or unexpected mitogenic responses were observed in any tissue type. Using a panel of human tissues, the in vitro tissue binding profile of Aranesp® was identical to Epoetin alfa. Neither molecule bound to human tissues other than those expressing the erythropoietin receptor.

Mutagenicity: Aranesp® was negative in the in vitro bacterial and CHO cell assays to detect mutagenicity and in the in vivo mouse micronucleus assay to detect clastogenicity.

Impairment of Fertility: When administered intravenously to male and female rats prior to and during mating, reproductive performance, fertility, and sperm assessment parameters were not affected at any doses evaluated (up to 10 mcg/kg/dose, administered 3 times weekly). An increase in post implantation fetal loss was seen at doses equal to or greater than 0.5 mcg/kg/dose, administered 3 times weekly.

Pregnancy Category C

When Aranesp® was administered intravenously to rats and rabbits during gestation, no evidence of a direct embryotoxic, fetotoxic, or teratogenic outcome was observed at doses up to 20 mcg/kg/day. The only adverse effect observed was a slight reduction in fetal weight, which occurred at doses causing exaggerated pharmacological effects in the dams (1 mcg/kg/day and higher). No deleterious effects on uterine implantation were seen in either species. No significant placental transfer of Aranesp® was observed in rats. An increase in post implantation fetal loss was observed in studies assessing fertility (see PRECAUTIONS:Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility:Impairment of Fertility).

Intravenous injection of Aranesp® to female rats every other day from day 6 of gestation through day 23 of lactation at doses of 2.5 mcg/kg/dose and higher resulted in offspring (F1 generation) with decreased body weights, which correlated with a low incidence of deaths, as well as delayed eye opening and delayed preputial separation. No adverse effects were seen in the F2 offspring.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Aranesp® should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether Aranesp® is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when Aranesp® is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric UsePediatric CRF Patients

A study of the conversion from Epoetin alfa to Aranesp® among pediatric CRF patients over 1 year of age showed similar safety and efficacy to the findings from adult conversion studies (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY and CLINICAL STUDIES). Safety and efficacy in the initial treatment of anemic pediatric CRF patients or in the conversion from another erythropoietin to Aranesp® in pediatric CRF patients less than 1 year of age have not been established.

Pediatric Cancer Patients

The safety and efficacy of Aranesp® in pediatric cancer patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Of the 1801 CRF patients in clinical studies of Aranesp®, 44% were age 65 and over, while 17% were age 75 and over. Of the 873 cancer patients in clinical studies receiving Aranesp® and concomitant chemotherapy, 45% were age 65 and over, while 14% were age 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or efficacy were observed between older and younger patients.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

General

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of Aranesp® cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of other drugs and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Immunogenicity

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity. Neutralizing antibodies to erythropoietin, in association with PRCA or severe anemia (with or without other cytopenias), have been reported in patients receiving Aranesp® (see WARNINGS: Pure Red Cell Aplasia) during post-marketing experience.

In clinical studies, the percentage of patients with antibodies to Aranesp® was examined using the BIAcore assay. Sera from 1501 CRF patients and 1159 cancer patients were tested. At baseline, prior to Aranesp® treatment, binding antibodies were detected in 59 (4%) of CRF patients and 36 (3%) of cancer patients. While receiving Aranesp® therapy (range 22-177 weeks), a follow-up sample was taken. One additional CRF patient and eight additional cancer patients developed antibodies capable of binding Aranesp®. None of the patients had antibodies capable of neutralizing the activity of Aranesp® or endogenous erythropoietin at baseline or at end of study. No clinical sequelae consistent with PRCA were associated with the presence of these antibodies.

The incidence of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies across products within this class (erythropoietic proteins) may be misleading.

Chronic Renal Failure PatientsAdult Patients

In all studies, the most frequently reported serious adverse events with Aranesp® were infection, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris/cardiac chest pain, thrombosis vascular access, and cardiac arrhythmia/cardiac arrest. The most frequently reported adverse events resulting in clinical intervention (e.g., discontinuation of Aranesp®, adjustment in dosage, or the need for concomitant medication to treat an adverse reaction symptom) were infection, hypertension, hypotension, and muscle spasm. See WARNINGS: Increased Mortality, Serious Cardiovascular Events, Thromboembolic Events, and Stroke and Hypertension

The data described below reflect exposure to Aranesp® in 1801 CRF patients, including 675 exposed for at least 6 months, of whom 185 were exposed for greater than 1 year. Aranesp® was evaluated in active-controlled (n = 823) and uncontrolled studies (n = 978). These data include a pooled analysis of CRF patients not on dialysis and dialysis patients who were studied for the correction of anemia and maintenance of hemoglobin.

The population encompassed an age range from 18 to 94 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients were male. The percentages of Caucasian, Black, Asian, and Hispanic patients were 80%, 13%, 3%, and 2%, respectively. The median weekly dose of Aranesp® for patients who received either once weekly or once every 2 week administration was 0.44 mcg/kg (25th, 75th percentiles: 0.30, 0.64 mcg/kg).

Some of the adverse events reported are typically associated with CRF, or recognized complications of dialysis, and may not necessarily be attributable to Aranesp® therapy. No important differences in adverse event rates between treatment groups were observed in controlled studies in which patients received Aranesp® or other recombinant erythropoietins.

The data in Table 2 reflect those adverse events occurring in at least 5% of patients treated with Aranesp®.

Table 2. Adverse Events Occurring in ≥ 5% of CRF Patients
Event Patients Treated with Aranesp®
(n = 1801)
APPLICATION SITE

Injection Site Pain 6%
BODY AS A WHOLE

Peripheral Edema 10%

Fatigue 9%

Fever 7%

Death 6%

Chest Pain, Unspecified 7%

Fluid Overload 6%

Access Infection 6%

Influenza-like Symptoms 6%

Access Hemorrhage 7%

Asthenia 5%
CARDIOVASCULAR

Hypertension 20%

Hypotension 20%

Cardiac Arrhythmias/Cardiac Arrest 8%

Angina Pectoris/Cardiac Chest Pain 8%

Thrombosis Vascular Access 6%

Congestive Heart Failure 5%
CNS/PNS

Headache 15%

Dizziness 7%
GASTROINTESTINAL

Diarrhea 14%

Vomiting 14%

Nausea 11%

Abdominal Pain 10%

Constipation 5%
MUSCULO-SKELETAL

Muscle Spasm 17%

Arthralgia 9%

Limb Pain 8%

Back Pain 7%
RESISTANCE MECHANISM

Infection* 24%
RESPIRATORY

Upper Respiratory Infection 15%

Dyspnea 10%

Cough 9%

Bronchitis 5%
SKIN AND APPENDAGES

Pruritus 6%
*Infection includes sepsis, bacteremia, pneumonia, peritonitis, and abscess.

The incidence rates for other clinically significant events are shown in Table 3.

Table 3. Percent Incidence of Other Clinically Significant Events in CRF Patients
Event Patients Treated with Aranesp®
(n = 1801)
Acute Myocardial Infarction 2%
Stroke 2%
Seizure 1%
Transient Ischemic Attack ≤1%
Pediatric Patients

In Study N7, Aranesp® was administered to 81 pediatric CRF patients who had stable hemoglobin concentrations while previously receiving Epoetin alfa (see CLINICAL STUDIES). In this study, the most frequently reported serious adverse events with Aranesp® were catheter sepsis, fever, catheter related infection, chronic renal failure, and vascular access complication. The most commonly reported adverse events were fever, headache, nasopharyngitis, hypertension, hypotension, injection site pain, cough, peritonitis, and vomiting. Aranesp® administration was discontinued because of injection site pain in two patients and moderate hypertension in a third patient.

Studies have not evaluated the effects of Aranesp® when administered to pediatric patients as the initial treatment for the anemia associated with CRF.

Thrombotic Events

Vascular access thrombosis in hemodialysis patients occurred in clinical trials at an annualized rate of 0.22 events per patient year of Aranesp® therapy. Rates of thrombotic events (e.g., vascular access thrombosis, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary emboli) with Aranesp® therapy were similar to those observed with other recombinant erythropoietins in these trials; the median duration of exposure was 12 weeks.

Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

The incidence data described below reflect the exposure to Aranesp® in 873 cancer patients including patients exposed to Aranesp® once weekly (547, 63%), once every 2 weeks (128, 16%), and once every 3 weeks (198, 23%). Aranesp® was evaluated in seven studies that were active-controlled and/or placebo-controlled studies of up to 6 months duration. The Aranesp®-treated patient demographics were as follows: median age of 63 years (range of 20 to 91 years); 40% male; 88% Caucasian, 5% Hispanic, 4% Black, and 3% Asian. Over 90% of patients had locally advanced or metastatic cancer, with the remainder having early stage disease. Patients with solid tumors (e.g., lung, breast, colon, ovarian cancers) and lymphoproliferative malignancies (e.g., lymphoma, multiple myeloma) were enrolled in the clinical studies. All of the 873 Aranesp®-treated subjects also received concomitant cyclic chemotherapy.

The most frequently reported serious adverse events included death (10%), fever (4%), pneumonia (3%), dehydration (3%), vomiting (2%), and dyspnea (2%). The most commonly reported adverse events were fatigue, edema, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and dyspnea (see Table 4 ). Except for those events listed in Tables 4 and 5, the incidence of adverse events in clinical studies occurred at a similar rate compared with patients who received placebo and were generally consistent with the underlying disease and its treatment with chemotherapy. The most frequently reported reasons for discontinuation of Aranesp® were progressive disease, death, discontinuation of the chemotherapy, asthenia, dyspnea, pneumonia, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. No important differences in adverse event rates between treatment groups were observed in controlled studies in which patients received Aranesp® or other recombinant erythropoietins.

Table 4. Adverse Events Occurring in ≥ 5% of Patients Receiving Chemotherapy
Event

Aranesp®

(n = 873)

Placebo

(n = 221)
BODY AS A WHOLE

Fatigue 33% 30%

Edema 21% 10%

Fever 19% 16%
CNS/PNS

Dizziness 14% 8%

Headache 12% 9%
GASTROINTESTINAL

Diarrhea 22% 12%

Constipation 18% 17%
METABOLIC/NUTRITION

Dehydration 5% 3%
MUSCULO-SKELETAL

Arthralgia 13% 6%

Myalgia 8% 5%
SKIN AND APPENDAGES

Rash 7% 3%
Table 5. Incidence of Other Clinically Significant Adverse Events in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy
Event

All Aranesp®

(n = 873)

Placebo

(n = 221)
Hypertension 3.7% 3.2%
Seizures/Convulsions* 0.6% 0.5%
Thrombotic Events 6.2% 4.1%

Pulmonary Embolism 1.3% 0.0%

Thrombosis 5.6% 4.1%
*Seizures/Convulsions include the preferred terms: Convulsions, Convulsions Grand Mal, and Convulsions Local.Thrombosis includes: Thrombophlebitis, Thrombophlebitis Deep, Thrombosis Venous, Thrombosis Venous Deep, Thromboembolism, and Thrombosis.

In a randomized controlled trial of Aranesp® 500 mcg once every 3 weeks (n = 353) and Aranesp® 2.25 mcg/kg once weekly (n = 352), the incidences of all adverse events and of serious adverse events were similar between the two groups.

Thrombotic and Cardiovascular Events

Overall, the incidence of thrombotic events was 6.2% for Aranesp® and 4.1% for placebo. However, the following events were reported more frequently in Aranesp®-treated patients than in placebo controls: pulmonary embolism, thromboembolism, thrombosis, and thrombophlebitis (deep and/or superficial). In addition, edema of any type was more frequently reported in Aranesp®-treated patients (21%) than in patients who received placebo (10%).

OVERDOSAGE

The expected manifestations of Aranesp® overdosage include signs and symptoms associated with an excessive and/or rapid increase in hemoglobin concentration, including any of the cardiovascular events described in WARNINGS and listed in ADVERSE REACTIONS. Patients receiving an overdosage of Aranesp® should be monitored closely for cardiovascular events and hematologic abnormalities. Polycythemia should be managed acutely with phlebotomy, as clinically indicated. Following resolution of the effects due to Aranesp® overdosage, reintroduction of Aranesp® therapy should be accompanied by close monitoring for evidence of rapid increases in hemoglobin concentration (> 1 g/dL in any 2-week period). In patients with an excessive hematopoietic response, reduce the Aranesp® dose in accordance with the recommendations described in DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

IMPORTANT: See BOXED WARNINGS and WARNINGS: Increased Mortality, Serious Cardiovascular Events, Thromboembolic Events, and Stroke.

Aranesp® is supplied in vials or in prefilled syringes with UltraSafe® Needle Guards*. Following administration of Aranesp® from the prefilled syringe, the UltraSafe® Needle Guard should be activated to prevent accidental needle sticks.

Aranesp® is also supplied in prefilled SureClick™ autoinjectors containing the same dosage strengths as the prefilled syringes. Because the autoinjectors are designed to deliver the full content, autoinjectors should only be used for patients who need the full dose. If the required dose is not available in an autoinjector, prefilled syringes, or vials should be used to administer the required dose. Autoinjectors are for subcutaneous administration only.

Chronic Renal Failure Patients

Aranesp® may be administered either intravenously or subcutaneously as a single weekly injection. In patients on hemodialysis, the intravenous route is recommended. The dose should be started and slowly adjusted as described below based on hemoglobin levels. If a patient fails to respond or maintain a response, this should be evaluated (see WARNINGS: Pure Red Cell Aplasia, PRECAUTIONS: Lack or Loss of Response to Aranesp® and PRECAUTIONS: Laboratory Tests). When Aranesp® therapy is initiated or adjusted, the hemoglobin should be followed weekly until stabilized and monitored at least monthly thereafter. During therapy, hematological parameters should be monitored regularly. Doses must be individualized to ensure that hemoglobin is maintained at an appropriate level for each patient.

For patients who respond to Aranesp® with a rapid increase in hemoglobin (e.g., more than 1 g/dL in any 2-week period), the dose of Aranesp® should be reduced.

Individualize dosing to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL.

Starting Dose Correction of Anemia

The initial dose by subcutaneous or intravenous administration is 0.45 mcg/kg body weight, as a single injection once weekly. Alternatively, in patients not receiving dialysis, an initial dose of 0.75 mcg/kg may be administered subcutaneously as a single injection once every 2 weeks. If hemoglobin excursions outside the recommended range occur, the Aranesp® dose should be adjusted as described below.

The use of Aranesp® in pediatric CRF patients as the initial treatment to correct anemia has not been studied.

Maintenance Dose

The dose should be individualized to maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL (see Dose Adjustment). If hemoglobin excursions outside the recommended range occur, the Aranesp® dose should be adjusted as described below. For many patients, the appropriate maintenance dose will be lower than the starting dose. CRF patients not on dialysis, in particular, may require lower maintenance doses. In the maintenance phase, Aranesp® may continue to be administered as a single injection once weekly or once every 2 weeks.

Dose Adjustment

The dose should be adjusted for each patient to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. If hemoglobin excursions outside the recommended range occur, the Aranesp® dose should be adjusted as described below. Increases in dose should not be made more frequently than once a month.

If the hemoglobin is increasing and approaching 12 g/dL, the dose should be reduced by approximately 25%. If the hemoglobin continues to increase, doses should be temporarily withheld until the hemoglobin begins to decrease, at which point therapy should be reinitiated at a dose approximately 25% below the previous dose. If the hemoglobin increases by more than 1 g/dL in a 2-week period, the dose should be decreased by approximately 25%.

If the increase in hemoglobin is less than 1 g/dL over 4 weeks and iron stores are adequate (see PRECAUTIONS: Laboratory Tests), the dose of Aranesp® may be increased by approximately 25% of the previous dose. Further increases may be made at 4-week intervals until the specified hemoglobin is obtained.

For patients whose hemoglobin does not attain a level within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL despite the use of appropriate Aranesp® dose titrations over a 12-week period:

  • do not administer higher Aranesp® doses and use the lowest dose that will maintain a hemoglobin level sufficient to avoid the need for recurrent RBC transfusions,
  • evaluate and treat for other causes of anemia (see PRECAUTIONS: Lack or Loss of Response to Aranesp®), and
  • thereafter, hemoglobin should continue to be monitored and if responsiveness improves, Aranesp® dose adjustments should be made as described above; discontinue Aranesp® if responsiveness does not improve and the patient needs recurrent RBC transfusions.
Conversion From Epoetin alfa to Aranesp®

The starting weekly dose of Aranesp® for adults and pediatric patients should be estimated on the basis of the weekly Epoetin alfa dose at the time of substitution (see Table 6 ). For pediatric patients receiving a weekly Epoetin alfa dose of < 1500 units/week, the available data are insufficient to determine an Aranesp® conversion dose. Because of variability, doses should be titrated to achieve and maintain hemoglobin levels within the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. Due to the longer serum half-life, Aranesp® should be administered less frequently than Epoetin alfa. Aranesp® should be administered once a week if a patient was receiving Epoetin alfa 2 to 3 times weekly. Aranesp® should be administered once every 2 weeks if a patient was receiving Epoetin alfa once per week. The route of administration (intravenous or subcutaneous) should be maintained.

Table 6. Estimated Aranesp® Starting Doses (mcg/week) for Patients Based on Previous Epoetin alfa Dose (Units/week)
Previous Weekly Epoetin alfa Dose (Units/week)

Weekly Aranesp® Dose (mcg/week)

Adult Pediatric
< 1,500 6.25 See text*
1,500 to 2,499 6.25 6.25
2,500 to 4,999 12.5 10
5,000 to 10,999 25 20
11,000 to 17,999 40 40
18,000 to 33,999 60 60
34,000 to 89,999 100 100
> 90,000 200 200
*For pediatric patients receiving a weekly Epoetin alfa dose of < 1,500 units/week, the available data are insufficient to determine an Aranesp® conversion dose.
Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

Only prescribers enrolled in the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program may prescribe and/or dispense Aranesp® (see WARNINGS: ESA APPRISE Oncology Program).

For pediatric patients, see PRECAUTIONS: Pediatric Use.

The recommended starting dose for Aranesp® administered weekly is 2.25 mcg/kg as a subcutaneous injection.

The recommended starting dose for Aranesp® administered once every 3 weeks is 500 mcg as a subcutaneous injection.

Therapy should not be initiated at hemoglobin levels > 10 g/dL. For both dosing schedules, the dose should be adjusted for each patient to maintain the lowest hemoglobin level sufficient to avoid RBC transfusion. If the rate of hemoglobin increase is more than 1 g/dL per 2-week period or when the hemoglobin reaches a level needed to avoid transfusion, the dose should be reduced by 40% of the previous dose. If the hemoglobin exceeds a level needed to avoid transfusion, Aranesp® should be temporarily withheld until the hemoglobin approaches a level where transfusions may be required. At this point, therapy should be reinitiated at a dose 40% below the previous dose.

For patients receiving weekly administration, if there is less than a 1 g/dL increase in hemoglobin after 6 weeks of therapy, the dose of Aranesp® should be increased up to 4.5 mcg/kg.

Discontinue Aranesp® if after 8 weeks of therapy there is no response as measured by hemoglobin levels or if transfusions are still required.

Discontinue Aranesp® following the completion of a chemotherapy course (see BOXED WARNINGS: Cancer).

Preparation and Administration of Aranesp®

Do not shake Aranesp® or leave vials, syringes, or prefilled SureClick™ autoinjectors exposed to light. After removing the vials, prefilled syringes, or autoinjectors from the refrigerator, protect from room light until administration. Vigorous shaking or exposure to light may denature Aranesp®, causing it to become biologically inactive. Always store vials, prefilled syringes, or autoinjectors of Aranesp® in their carton until use.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. Do not use any vials, prefilled syringes, or autoinjectors exhibiting particulate matter or discoloration.

Do not dilute Aranesp®.

Do not administer Aranesp® in conjunction with other drug solutions.

Aranesp® contains no preservatives. Discard any unused portion. Do not pool unused portions from the vials or prefilled syringes. Do not use the vial, prefilled syringe, or autoinjector more than one time.

Following administration of Aranesp® from the prefilled syringe, activate the UltraSafe® Needle Guard. Place your hands behind the needle, grasp the guard with one hand, and slide the guard forward until the needle is completely covered and the guard clicks into place. NOTE: If an audible click is not heard, the needle guard may not be completely activated.

The prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector is designed to deliver the full dose. The completion of the injection is signaled by an audible click. Removal of the autoinjector from the injection site automatically extends a needle cover.

The autoinjectors, the syringes used with vials, and the entire prefilled syringe with activated needle guard should be disposed of in a puncture-proof container.

See the accompanying “Patient Instructions for Use” insert for complete instructions on the preparation and administration of Aranesp® for patients, including injection site selection.

HOW SUPPLIED

Aranesp® is available in single‑dose vials in two solutions, an albumin solution and a polysorbate solution. The words “Albumin Free” appear on the polysorbate container labels and the package main panels as well as other panels as space permits. Aranesp® single‑dose prefilled syringes and prefilled SureClick™ autoinjectors are available in albumin and polysorbate solutions. Both prefilled syringes and autoinjectors are supplied with a 27-gauge, ½-inch needle.

Each prefilled syringe is equipped with an UltraSafe® Needle Guard that is manually activated to cover the needle during disposal. The needle cover of the prefilled syringe contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex). The autoinjector has a needle cover that automatically extends as the autoinjector is removed from the injection site after completion of the injection.

Aranesp® is available in the following packages:


Single-dose Prefilled Syringe (SingleJect®) with a 27-gauge, ½-inch needle with an UltraSafe® Needle Guard, Polysorbate Solution
1 Syringe/Pack, 4 Packs/Case

200 mcg/0.4 mL 

NDC 54868-5428-0

300 mcg/0.6 mL

NDC 54868-5429-0

500 mcg/1 mL


NDC 54868-5867-0




Storage

Store at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F). Do not freeze or shake. Protect from light.

REFERENCES

REFERENCES
  1. Egrie JC, Browne JK. Development and characterization of novel erythropoiesis stimulating protein (NESP). Br J Cancer. 2001;84 (suppl 1):3-10.
  2. Singh AK, Szczech L, Tang KL, et al. Correction of Anemia with Epoetin Alfa in Chronic Kidney Disease. N Engl J Med. 2006; 355: 2085-98.
  3. Besarab A, Bolton WK, Browne JK, et al. The effects of normal as compared with low hematocrit values in patients with cardiac disease who are receiving hemodialysis and epoetin. N Engl J Med. 1998; 339:584-590.
  4. Leyland-Jones B, Semiglazov V, Pawlicki M, et al. Maintaining Normal Hemoglobin Levels With Epoetin Alfa in Mainly Nonanemic Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy: A Survival Study. JCO. 2005; 23(25): 1-13.
  5. Bohlius J, Wilson J, Seidenfeld J, et al. Recombinant Human Erythropoietins and Cancer Patients: Updated Meta-Analysis of 57 Studies Including 9353 Patients. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006; 98: 708-14.

Rx only

This product’s label may have been revised after this insert was used in production. For further product information and the current package insert, please visit www.amgen.com or call our medical information department toll-free at 1-800-77AMGEN (1-800-772-6436). This product, the process of its manufacture, or its use, may be covered by one or more US Patents, including US Patent No. 7,217,689.

[Amgen Logo]

Manufactured by:

Amgen Manufacturing, Limited, a subsidiary of Amgen Inc.
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799

©2001-2010 Amgen Inc. All rights reserved.

* UltraSafe® is a registered trademark of Safety Syringes, Inc.

1xxxxxx - v24

Revised: 05/2010



Relabeling of "Additional Barcode" label by:
Physicians Total Care, Inc.
Tulsa, OK      74146

MEDICATION GUIDE

Aranesp® (Air-uh-nesp)
(darbepoetin alfa)

Read this Medication Guide before you start Aranesp, each time you refill your prescription, and if you are told by your healthcare provider that there is new information about Aranesp. This Medication Guide does not take the place of talking to your healthcare provider about your medical condition or your treatment. Talk with your healthcare provider regularly about the use of Aranesp and ask if there is new information about Aranesp.

What is the most important information I should know about Aranesp?

Using Aranesp can lead to death or other serious side effects.

Patients with cancer:

Your healthcare provider has received special training through the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program in order to prescribe Aranesp. Before you can begin to receive Aranesp, you must sign the ESA APPRISE Oncology Patient and Healthcare Professional (HCP) Acknowledgement Form to document that your healthcare provider discussed the risks of Aranesp with you. When you sign this form, you are stating that you are aware of the risks associated with use of Aranesp.

These risks include that your tumor may grow faster and you may die sooner when Aranesp is used experimentally to try to raise your hemoglobin beyond the amount needed to avoid red blood cell transfusion or if you are not getting strong doses of chemotherapy. It is not known whether these risks exist when Aranesp is given according to the FDA-approved directions for use.

You should discuss with your doctor:

  • Why Aranesp treatment is being prescribed.
  • What are the chances you will get red blood cell transfusions if you do not take Aranesp.
  • What are the chances you will get red blood cell transfusions even if you take Aranesp.
  • How taking Aranesp may affect the success of your cancer treatment.

If you decide to take Aranesp, your healthcare provider should prescribe the smallest dose of Aranesp to lower the chance of getting red blood cell transfusions.

  • After you have finished your chemotherapy course, Aranesp treatment should be stopped.
  • Aranesp does not improve the symptoms of anemia (lower than normal number of red blood cells), quality of life, fatigue, or well-being for patients with cancer.

All patients, including patients with cancer or chronic kidney failure:

  • You may get serious heart problems such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and may die sooner if you are treated with Aranesp to a hemoglobin level above 12 g/dL.
  • You may get blood clots at any time while taking Aranesp. If you are receiving Aranesp and you are going to have surgery, talk to your healthcare provider about whether or not you need to take a blood thinner to lessen the chance of blood clots during or following surgery. Clots can form in blood vessels (veins), especially in your leg (deep venous thrombosis or DVT). Pieces of a blood clot may travel to the lungs and block the blood circulation in the lungs (pulmonary embolus).

Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you have any of these symptoms of blood clots:

  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain in your legs, with or without swelling
  • A cool or pale arm or leg
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or trouble understanding others’ speech
  • Sudden numbness or weakness in your face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of your body
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Loss of consciousness (fainting)
  • Hemodialysis vascular access stops working. If you are a patient with chronic kidney failure and have a hemodialysis vascular access, blood clots may form in this access.

Also see “What are the possible side effects of Aranesp?" below.

What is Aranesp?

Aranesp is a man-made form of the protein human erythropoietin that is given to patients to lessen the need for red blood cell transfusions. Aranesp stimulates your bone marrow to make more red blood cells. Having more red blood cells raises your hemoglobin level. If your hemoglobin level stays too high or if your hemoglobin goes up too quickly, this may lead to serious health problems which may result in death. These serious health problems may happen even if you take Aranesp and do not have an increase in your hemoglobin level.

Aranesp may be used to treat a lower than normal number of red blood cells (anemia) if it is caused by:

  • Chronic kidney failure (you may or may not be on dialysis)
  • Chemotherapy that is used to treat some types of cancer

Aranesp should not be used for treatment of anemia:

  • If you have cancer and you are not receiving chemotherapy that may cause anemia
  • If your cancer has a high chance of being cured

Who should not take Aranesp?

Do not take Aranesp if you:

  • Have cancer and have not been counseled by your healthcare provider regarding the risks of Aranesp and signed the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program Patient and Healthcare Professional (HCP) Acknowledgement Form before you begin to receive Aranesp.
  • Have high blood pressure that is not controlled (uncontrolled hypertension).
  • Have been told by your healthcare provider that you have or have ever had a type of anemia called Pure Red Cell Aplasia (PRCA) that starts after treatment with Aranesp or other erythropoietin medicines.
  • Have allergies to any of the ingredients in Aranesp. See the end of this Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in Aranesp.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking Aranesp?

Aranesp may not be right for you. Tell your healthcare provider about all your health conditions, including if you:

  • Have heart disease.
  • Have high blood pressure.
  • Have had a seizure (convulsion) or stroke.
  • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Aranesp may harm your unborn baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about possible pregnancy and birth control choices that are right for you.
  • Are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. It is not known if Aranesp passes into breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines with you and show it to your healthcare provider when you get a new medicine.

How should I take Aranesp?

Patients with cancer:

Before you begin to receive Aranesp, your healthcare provider will:

  • Ask you to review this Aranesp Medication Guide
  • Explain the risks of Aranesp and answer all your questions about Aranesp
  • Have you sign the ESA APPRISE Oncology Program Patient and Healthcare Professional (HCP) Acknowledgement Form

All patients:

  • Continue to follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for diet, dialysis, and medicines, including medicines for high blood pressure, while taking Aranesp.
  • Have your blood pressure checked as instructed by your healthcare provider.
  • If you or your caregiver has been trained to give Aranesp shots (injections) at home:
    • Be sure that you read, understand, and follow the “Patient Instructions for Use” that come with Aranesp.
    • Take Aranesp exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to. Do not change the dose of Aranesp unless told to do so by your healthcare provider.
    • Your healthcare provider will show you how much Aranesp to use, how to inject it, how often it should be injected, and how to safely throw away the used vial, syringes, and needles.
    • If you miss a dose of Aranesp, call your healthcare provider right away and ask what to do.
    • If you take more than the prescribed amount of Aranesp, call your healthcare provider right away.

What are the possible side effects of Aranesp?

Aranesp may cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about Aranesp?”

Other side effects of Aranesp, which may also be serious, include:

  • High blood pressure in patients with chronic kidney failure. Your blood pressure may go up or be difficult to control with blood pressure medicine while taking Aranesp. This can happen even if you have never had high blood pressure before. Your healthcare provider should check your blood pressure often. If your blood pressure does go up, your healthcare provider may prescribe new or more blood pressure medicine.
  • Seizures. If you have any seizures while taking Aranesp, get medical help right away and tell your healthcare provider.
  • Antibodies to Aranesp. Your body may make antibodies to Aranesp. These antibodies can block or lessen your body’s ability to make red blood cells and cause you to have severe anemia. Call your healthcare provider if you have unusual tiredness, lack of energy, dizziness, or fainting. You may need to stop taking Aranesp.
  • Serious allergic reactions. Serious allergic reactions can cause a rash over your whole body, shortness of breath, wheezing, dizziness and fainting because of a drop in blood pressure, swelling around your mouth or eyes, fast pulse, or sweating. If you have a serious allergic reaction, stop using Aranesp and call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

The needle cover on the prefilled syringe contains a material that is like latex. If you know you are allergic to latex, talk to your healthcare provider before using Aranesp.

Common side effects of Aranesp include:

  • Swelling in cancer patients
  • Rash
  • Injection site pain

These are not all of the possible side effects of Aranesp. Your healthcare provider can give you a more complete list. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects that bother you or that do not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I store Aranesp?

  • Do not shake Aranesp.
  • Protect Aranesp from light.
  • Store Aranesp in the refrigerator between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).
  • Do not freeze. Do not use Aranesp that has been frozen.

Keep Aranesp and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about Aranesp

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Use Aranesp only for the condition for which it has been prescribed. Do not give Aranesp to other people even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them.

This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Aranesp. If you would like more information about Aranesp, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about Aranesp that is written for healthcare professionals. For more information, go to the following website: www.aranesp.com or call 1-800-77-AMGEN.

What are the ingredients in Aranesp?

Active Ingredient: darbepoetin alfa

Inactive Ingredients:

  • polysorbate solution: polysorbate 80, sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous, and sodium chloride in Water for Injection, USP.
  • albumin solution: albumin (human), sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, sodium phosphate dibasic anhydrous, and sodium chloride in Water for Injection, USP.


Manufactured by:

Amgen Manufacturing, Limited, a subsidiary of Amgen Inc.
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799

© 2001-2010 Amgen Inc. All rights reserved.

1xxxxxx - v2

Revised: 02/2010

This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Aranesp® (Air-uh-nesp)
(darbepoetin alfa)

Single-dose Vial

Use these instructions if you or your caregiver has been trained to give Aranesp injections at home. Do not try to give yourself the injection unless you have received training from your healthcare provider. If you are not sure about giving the injection or if you have questions, ask your healthcare provider for help.

Before reading these instructions for use, read the Medication Guide that comes with Aranesp for the most important information you need to know.

When you receive your Aranesp vial and syringes make sure that:

  • The name Aranesp appears on the carton and vial label.
  • The expiration date on the vial label has not passed. Do not use a vial of Aranesp after the expiration date on the label.
  • The dose strength of the Aranesp vial (number of micrograms [mcg] in the colored square on the package and on the vial label) is the same as your healthcare provider prescribed.
  • The Aranesp liquid in the vial is clear and colorless. Do not use Aranesp if the liquid in the vial looks discolored or cloudy, or if the liquid has lumps, flakes, or particles.
  • The Aranesp vial has a color cap on the top of the vial. Do not use a vial of Aranesp if the color cap on the top of the vial has been removed or is missing.
  • Use only the type of disposable syringe and needle that your healthcare provider has prescribed.
  • Do not shake Aranesp. If shaking has occurred, the solution in the vial may look foamy and should not be used.
  • Do not freeze Aranesp. Do not use a vial of Aranesp that has been frozen.
  • Keep Aranesp away from light.

How should I prepare for an injection of Aranesp?

  • Always keep an extra syringe and needle on hand.
  • Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions on how to measure your dose of Aranesp. This dose will be measured in mcg per milliliter (mL) or cc (1 mL is the same as 1 cc). Use a syringe that is marked in tenths of mL (for example, 0.2 mL or 0.2 cc). Using the wrong syringe can lead to a mistake in your dose and you could inject too much or too little Aranesp.

Only use disposable syringes and needles. Use the syringes and needles only one time and then throw them away as instructed by your healthcare provider.

Important: Follow these instructions exactly to help avoid infections.

Preparing the dose:

  1. Remove the vial of Aranesp from the refrigerator. During this time, protect the solution from light.
  2. Do not use a vial of Aranesp more than one time.
  3. Do not shake Aranesp.
  4. Gather the other supplies you will need for your injection (vial, syringe, alcohol wipes, cotton ball, and a puncture-proof container for throwing away the syringe and needle). See Figure 1.
    image of Figure 1
  5. Check the date on the Aranesp vial to be sure that the drug has not expired.
  6. Wash your hands well with soap and water before preparing the medicine. See Figure 2.
    image of Figure 2
  7. Flip off the protective color cap on the top of the vial. Do not remove the grey rubber stopper. Wipe the top of the grey rubber stopper with an alcohol wipe. See Figures 3 and 4.
    image of Figure 3 & 4
  8. Check the package containing the syringe. If the package has been opened or damaged, do not use that syringe. Throw away the syringe in the puncture-proof disposable container. If the syringe package is undamaged, open the package and remove the syringe.
  9. Using a syringe and needle that has been recommended by your healthcare provider, carefully remove the needle cover. See Figure 5. Then draw air into the syringe by pulling back on the plunger. The amount of air drawn into the syringe should be equal to the amount (mL or cc) of the Aranesp dose prescribed by your healthcare provider. See Figure 6.
    image of Figure 5 & 6
  10. With the vial on a flat work surface, insert the needle straight down through the grey rubber stopper of the Aranesp vial. See Figure 7.
  11. Push the plunger of the syringe down to inject the air from the syringe into the vial of Aranesp. The air injected into the vial will allow Aranesp to be easily withdrawn into the syringe. See Figure 7.
    image of Figure 7
  12. Keep the needle inside the vial. Turn the vial and syringe upside down. Be sure the tip of the needle is in the Aranesp liquid. Keep the vial upside down. Slowly pull back on the plunger to fill the syringe with Aranesp liquid to the number (mL or cc) that matches the dose your healthcare provider prescribed. See Figure 8.
    image of Figure 8
  13. Keep the needle in the vial. Check for air bubbles in the syringe. A small amount of air is harmless. Too large an air bubble will give you the wrong Aranesp dose. To remove air bubbles, gently tap the syringe with your fingers until the air bubbles rise to the top of the syringe. Slowly push the plunger up to force the air bubbles out of the syringe. Keep the tip of the needle in the Aranesp liquid. Pull the plunger back to the number on the syringe that matches your dose. Check again for air bubbles. If there are still air bubbles, repeat the steps above to remove them. See Figures 9 and 10.
    image of Figure 9 & 10
  14. Double-check that you have the correct dose in the syringe. Lay the vial down on its side with the needle still in it until after you have selected and prepared a site for injection.

Selecting and preparing the injection site:

Aranesp can be injected into your body using two different ways (routes) as described below. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about how you should inject Aranesp. In patients on hemodialysis, the intravenous (IV) route is recommended.

1. Subcutaneous Route:

  • Aranesp can be injected directly into a layer of fat under your skin. This is called a subcutaneous injection. When giving subcutaneous injections, follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about changing the site for each injection. You may wish to write down the site where you have injected.
  • Do not inject Aranesp into an area that is tender, red, bruised, hard, or has scars or stretch marks. Recommended sites for injection are shown in Figure 11 below, including:
    • The outer area of the upper arms
    • The abdomen (except for the 2-inch area around the navel)
    • The front of the middle thighs
    • The upper outer area of the buttocks
      image of Figure 11
  • Clean the skin with an alcohol wipe where the injection is to be made. Be careful not to touch the skin that has been wiped clean. See Figure 12.
    image of Figure 12
  • Double-check that the correct amount of Aranesp is in the syringe.
  • Remove the prepared syringe and needle from the vial of Aranesp and hold it in the hand that you will use to inject the medicine.
  • Use the other hand to pinch a fold of skin at the cleaned injection site. Do not touch the cleaned area of skin. See Figure 13.
    image of Figure 13
  • Hold the syringe like you would hold a pencil. Use a quick “dart-like” motion to insert the needle either straight up and down (90-degree angle) or at a slight angle (45 degrees) into the skin. Let go of the skin and pull the plunger back slightly. If blood comes into the syringe, do not inject Aranesp since the needle may have entered a blood vessel; instead, withdraw the syringe, discard it in the puncture-proof container. Prepare a new syringe of Aranesp using the instructions above. Clean a new area of skin. In this new area of clean skin, again insert a new needle (as you did before), and again pull the plunger back slightly. If blood does not enter the syringe, inject the Aranesp by pushing the plunger all the way down. See Figure 14.
    image of Figure 14
  • Pull the needle out of the skin and press a cotton ball or gauze over the injection site and hold it there for several seconds. Do not recap the needle.
  • Dispose of the used syringe and needle as described below. Do not reuse syringes and needles.

2. Intravenous Route:

  • Aranesp can be injected in your vein through a special access port put in by your healthcare provider. This type of Aranesp injection is called an intravenous (IV) injection. This route is usually for hemodialysis patients.
  • If you have a dialysis vascular access, make sure it is working by checking it as your healthcare provider has shown you. Be sure to let your healthcare provider know right away if you are having any problems, or if you have any questions.
  • Wipe off the venous port of the hemodialysis tubing with an alcohol wipe. See Figure 15.
    image of Figure 15
  • Insert the needle of the syringe into the cleaned venous port and push the plunger all the way down to inject all the Aranesp. See Figure 16.
    image of Figure 16
  • Remove the syringe from the venous port. Do not recap the needle.
  • Dispose of the used syringe and needle as described below.

How should I dispose of syringes and needles?

Do not reuse disposable syringes and needles. Throw away syringes and needles as instructed by your healthcare provider by following these steps:

  • Do not throw the needle, syringe, or disposable container in the household trash or recycle.
  • Do not put the needle cover back on the needle.
  • Place all used needles and syringes in a puncture-proof disposable container with a lid. Do not use glass or clear plastic containers, or any container that will be recycled or returned to a store.
  • Keep the container out of the reach of children.
  • When the container is full, tape around the cap or lid to make sure the cap or lid does not come off. Throw away the puncture-proof disposable container as instructed by your healthcare provider. There may be special state and local laws for disposing of used needles and syringes. Do not throw the disposable container in the household trash. Do not recycle.


Manufactured by:

Amgen Manufacturing, Limited, a subsidiary of Amgen Inc.
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799

©2001-2008 Amgen Inc. All rights reserved.

1xxxxxx - v1
Revised: 08/2008

Aranesp® (Air-uh-nesp)
(darbepoetin alfa)

Single-Dose Prefilled Syringe (SingleJect®)

Use these instructions if you or your caregiver has been trained to give Aranesp injections at home. Do not give yourself the injection unless you have received training from your healthcare provider. If you are not sure about giving the injection or if you have questions, ask your healthcare provider for help.

Before reading these instructions, read the Medication Guide that comes with Aranesp for the most important information you need to know.

When you receive your Aranesp prefilled syringe make sure that:

  • The name Aranesp appears on the carton and prefilled syringe label.
  • The expiration date on the prefilled syringe label has not passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe of Aranesp after the expiration date on the label.
  • The dose strength of the Aranesp prefilled syringe (number of micrograms [mcg] in the colored square on the package and on the prefilled syringe label) is the same as your healthcare provider prescribed.
  • The Aranesp liquid in the prefilled syringe is clear and colorless. Do not use Aranesp if the liquid in the prefilled syringe looks discolored or cloudy, or if the liquid looks like it has lumps, flakes, or particles.
  • Do not use Aranesp in a prefilled syringe if the grey cover on the needle is off, or the needle guard (yellow sleeve on the syringe) has been pulled to extend over the needle (activated).
  • Do not shake Aranesp. Shaking could cause Aranesp not to work. If you shake Aranesp the solution may look foamy and it should not be used.
  • Do not freeze Aranesp. Do not use an Aranesp prefilled syringe that has been frozen.
  • Keep Aranesp away from light.

How should I prepare for an injection of Aranesp?

  • Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions on how to measure your dose of Aranesp. This dose will be measured in mcg per milliliter (mL) or cc (1 mL is the same as 1 cc). Use a syringe that is marked in tenths of mL (for example, 0.2 mL or 0.2 cc).

Use the prefilled syringe only one time and throw it away as instructed by your healthcare provider.

Important: Follow these instructions exactly to help avoid infections.

Preparing the dose:

  1. Remove one prefilled syringe from the refrigerator. During this time, protect the prefilled syringe from light. Keep the prefilled syringe in its wrapper until you are ready to prepare your dose. Do not leave the prefilled syringe in light.
  2. Use each Aranesp prefilled syringe only one time.
  3. Do not shake Aranesp.
  4. Gather the other supplies you will need for your injection (prefilled syringe with a transparent [clear] yellow plastic needle guard attached, alcohol wipes, cotton ball, and a puncture-proof container for throwing away the prefilled syringe). See Figure 1.
    image of Figure 1
  5. Check the date on the label on your Aranesp prefilled syringe to be sure that the drug has not expired.
  6. Wash your hands well with soap and water before preparing the medicine. See Figure 2.
    image of Figure 2
  7. Open the package and remove the syringe from the tray. Check to see that the needle cover is on and the yellow needle guard is covering the barrel of the syringe. If the needle guard is covering the needle, then it has already been activated. Do not use that syringe. Throw away the syringe in the puncture-proof disposable container. Use a new syringe. Do not slide the needle guard over the needle cover before injection. This will “activate” or lock the needle guard.
  8. Hold the syringe with the needle pointing up to prevent the Aranesp from leaking out of the needle. Carefully pull the needle cover straight off. See Figure 3.
    image of Figure 3
  9. Check the syringe for air bubbles. If there are air bubbles, gently tap the syringe with your fingers until the air bubbles rise to the top of the syringe. Slowly push the plunger up to force the air bubbles out of the syringe. See Figure 4.
    image of Figure 4
  10. Keep holding the syringe up. Slowly push the plunger to the line on the syringe that matches the dose your healthcare provider has prescribed.
  11. Check again to make sure that you have the correct dose in the syringe.
  12. When you put the syringe down on your work surface, be careful not to let the needle to touch anything.

Selecting and preparing the injection site:

Aranesp can be injected into your body using two different ways (routes) as described below. Follow your healthcare provider‘s instructions about how you should inject Aranesp. In patients on hemodialysis, the intravenous (IV) route is recommended.

1. Subcutaneous Route:

  • Aranesp can be injected directly into a layer of fat under your skin. This is called a subcutaneous injection. When giving subcutaneous injections, follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about changing the site for each injection. You may wish to write down the site where you have injected.
  • Do not inject Aranesp into an area that is tender, red, bruised, hard, or has scars or stretch marks. Recommended sites for injection are shown in Figure 5 below, including:
    • The outer area of the upper arms
    • The abdomen (except for the 2-inch area around the navel)
    • The front of the middle thighs
    • The upper outer area of your buttocks
      image of Figure 5
  • Clean the skin with an alcohol wipe where the injection is to be made. Be careful not to touch the skin that has been wiped clean. See Figure 6.
    image of Figure 6
  • Hold the prefilled syringe in the hand that you will use to inject the medicine.
  • Use the other hand to pinch a fold of skin at the cleaned injection site. Do not touch the cleaned area of skin. See Figure 7. Note: Hold the syringe barrel through the two needle guard windows when giving the injection.
    image of Figure 7
  • Hold the syringe like you would hold a pencil. Use a quick “dart-like” motion to insert the needle either straight up and down (90-degree angle) or at a slight angle (45 degrees) into the skin. Let go of the skin and pull the plunger back slightly. If blood comes into the syringe, do not inject Aranesp since the needle may have entered a blood vessel; instead, withdraw the syringe, discard it in the puncture-proof container. Prepare a new prefilled syringe of Aranesp using the instructions above. Clean a new area of skin. In this new area of clean skin, again insert the needle (as you did before), and again pull the plunger back slightly. If blood does not enter the syringe, inject the Aranesp by pushing the plunger all the way down. See Figure 8.
    image of Figure 8
  • Pull the needle out of the skin and press a cotton ball or gauze over the injection site and hold it there for several seconds. Do not recap the needle.
  • Dispose of the used prefilled syringe as described below. Do not reuse the prefilled syringe.

2. Intravenous Route:

  • Aranesp can be injected in your vein through a special access port put in by your healthcare provider. This type of Aranesp injection is called an intravenous (IV) injection. This route is usually for hemodialysis patients.
  • If you have a dialysis vascular access, make sure it is working by checking it as your healthcare provider has shown you. Be sure to let your healthcare provider know right away if you are having any problems, or if you have any questions.
  • Wipe off the venous port of the hemodialysis tubing with an alcohol wipe. See Figure 9.
    image of Figure 9
  • Insert the needle of the prefilled syringe into the cleaned venous port and push the plunger all the way down to inject all the Aranesp. See Figure 10.
    image of Figure 10
  • Remove the prefilled syringe from the venous port. Do not recap the needle.
  • Dispose of the used prefilled syringe as described below. Do not reuse the prefilled syringe.

Activation of the needle guard on used prefilled syringes

After injecting Aranesp from the prefilled syringe, do not recap the needle. Keep your hands behind the needle at all times. To activate the needle guard, hold the finger grip of the syringe with one hand and grasp the needle guard with your free hand. Slide the needle guard completely over the needle until the needle guard clicks into place. See Figures 11 and 12. NOTE: If an audible click is not heard, the needle guard may not be completely activated.

image of Figure 11 and 12

How should I dispose of the prefilled syringe?

Do not reuse the prefilled syringe. Throw away the prefilled syringe with the activated needle guard as directed by your healthcare provider by following these steps:

  • Do not throw the prefilled syringe or disposable container in the household trash or recycle.
  • Do not put the needle cover back on the needle.
  • Place the used prefilled syringe in a puncture-proof disposable container with a lid. Do not use glass or clear plastic containers, or any container that will be recycled or returned to a store.
  • Keep the container out of the reach of children.
  • When the container is full, tape around the cap or lid to make sure the cap or lid does not come off. Throw away the puncture-proof disposable container as instructed by your healthcare provider. There may be special state and local laws for disposing of used prefilled syringes. Do not throw the disposable container in the household trash. Do not recycle.


Manufactured by:

Amgen Manufacturing, Limited, a subsidiary of Amgen Inc.
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799

©2001-2008 Amgen Inc. All rights reserved.

1xxxxxx - v1

Patient Instructions for Use

Aranesp® (Air-uh-nesp)
(darbepoetin alfa)

Single-Use Prefilled SureClick™ Autoinjector

Use these instructions if you or your caregiver has been trained to give Aranesp injections at home. Do not give yourself the injection unless you have received training from your healthcare provider. If you are not sure about giving the injection or if you have questions, ask your healthcare provider for help.

Before reading these instructions for use, read the Medication Guide that comes with Aranesp for the most important information you need to know.

How should I take Aranesp?

This section explains how to give yourself an injection of Aranesp using the single-use prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector. You will give the injection into the tissue just under your skin. This is called a subcutaneous injection.

To give yourself a subcutaneous injection, you need:

  • A new, single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector
  • Alcohol or sterile wipe
  • A puncture-proof container so you can safely throw away the used autoinjector
    image of Figure 1

Important: Follow these instructions exactly to help avoid infections.

  1. Take your autoinjector out of the refrigerator. Keep the autoinjector in the box until you are ready to use it.
    • Do not shake your autoinjector. Shaking could cause Aranesp not to work. If you shake your Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector, the solution may look foamy and it should not be used.
    • Do not freeze your autoinjector. Do not use an autoinjector that has been frozen.
    • Do not leave your autoinjector in bright light. Do not use an autoinjector that has been left in light.
  2. Check that your single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector is the correct dose that your healthcare provider has prescribed.
  3. Do not use your autoinjector after the expiration date on the carton and on the autoinjector label.
  4. Remove the autoinjector from the box. During this time, protect the solution from light.
  5. Do not warm your single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector (for example, do not warm it in a microwave or in hot water).
  6. Do not remove the grey needle shield from the autoinjector until you are ready to inject.
  7. Do not put the grey needle shield back into the autoinjector.
  8. Look at Aranesp through the inspection window. It should be clear and colorless. Do not inject Aranesp if it looks discolored, cloudy, or has lumps, flakes, or particles.
  9. Wash your hands well.
  10. Find a comfortable, well-lit place and put your supplies (autoinjector, alcohol or sterile wipe, and puncture-proof container) where you can reach them.

On what part of my body should I give my injection?

Inject your single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector into:

  • The front center of your thighs
  • The back of your upper arms, only if someone else is injecting you
The abdomen may be used if your healthcare provider tells you it is alright.
image of Figure 2

Change the site for each injection to avoid soreness at any one site.

  • Do not inject into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard.
  • Avoid areas with scars or stretch marks.

Sometimes a problem may develop at the injection site. If there is a lump, swelling, or bruising at the injection site that does not go away, talk to your healthcare provider.

How do I give an injection into my thigh or the back of my arm?

image of Figure 3

  1. Wipe the injection site with a new alcohol or sterile wipe and allow your skin to dry. Do not touch this area again before giving the injection.
  2. Pick up your single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector in one hand and remove the grey needle shield by pulling it straight off. Do not twist it off and do not recap the grey needle shield, as either of these may damage the needle inside the autoinjector. Your single-use Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector has a cover that will protect you from needlesticks or an accidental loss of medicine by bumping or touching. See Figure 4.
    image of Figure 4
  3. Without pressing the red activation button, place the open end of the autoinjector on the injection site straight up and down at a right angle (90°) to your skin. Push the safety needle cover firmly against your skin to unlock it. Keep holding the autoinjector firmly against your skin. See Figure 5.
    image of Figure 5
  4. To start the injection: (1) press the red button; you will hear the first click, and then (2) right away, release your thumb. This starts the injection. Do not lift the autoinjector off of your skin. See Figure 6.
    image of Figure 6
  5. Wait until you hear the second click. After you hear the second click, lift the autoinjector straight up from the injection site. Your injection is finished. The safety needle cover on the autoinjector will automatically extend to cover the needle.

    If you did not remove your thumb from the red button, your will not hear the second “click.” If this happens, slowly count to 15 before lifting the autoinjector from the injection site. See Figure 7.

    Call your healthcare provider or 1-866-55AMGEN if you have trouble starting (activating) the autoinjector or cannot push in the red button to administer the medicine.
    image of Figure 7

The needle safety cover will move down over the needle and lock into place. The inspection window will be yellow, confirming the injection is finished. Make sure that the inspection window is yellow before lifting the autoinjector. This tells you that the injection is finished. You do not need to replace the grey needle shield. See Figure 8.

If the inspection window is not yellow, do not try to use the autoinjector again.

If you think that you have not received the full dose of Aranesp, do not repeat the injection using a new autoinjector.

Call your healthcare provider or 1-866-55AMGEN for assistance.

image of Figure 8

If you notice a spot of blood at the injection site, dab away with a cotton ball or tissues. Do not rub the injection site. If needed, you may cover the injection site with a bandage.

How do I inject into the abdomen?

image of Figure 9

Important skin pinch technique

When you use the skin pinch technique it is important to create a firm site for the injection.

  • Choose a site at least 2 inches away from the belly button (navel).
  • Pinch the skin of the abdomen firmly between the thumb and fingers. Creatie a space at least 2 inches wide (twice the width of the tip of the autoinjector). Keep a firm skin pinch for the whole injection. See Figure 10.
    image of Figure 10
  • Follow steps 1-5 above.

Remember

If you have any problems, ask your healthcare provider for help and advice.

How do I dispose of used autoinjectors?

Do not reuse the Aranesp prefilled SureClick™ autoinjector. Do not put the grey needle shield back into the autoinjector.

Throw away the used autoinjector as instructed by your healthcare provider or by following these steps:

  • Do not throw the used autoinjector in the household trash or recycle.
  • Place the used autoinjector in a puncture-proof disposable container with a lid. Do not use glass or clear plastic containers, or any container that will be recycled or returned to a store.
  • Keep the container out of the reach of children.
  • When the container is full, tape around the cap or lid to make sure the cap or lid does not come off. Throw away the puncture-proof disposable container as instructed by your healthcare provider. There may be special state and local laws for disposing of used needles and syringes. Do not throw the disposable container in the household trash. Do not recycle.

Keep Aranesp out of reach of children.


Manufactured by:

Amgen Manufacturing, Limited, a subsidiary of Amgen Inc.
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799

©2001-2008 Amgen Inc. All rights reserved.

1xxxxxx - v1

Revised: 08/2008

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL

PREFILLED SYRINGE, 200 MCG

Single Use Prefilled Syringes with 27 Gauge Needles

1 x 200 mcg/0.4 mL Prefilled Syringes

Aranesp® SingleJect®

(darbepoetin alfa)

recombinant

Albumin Free

200 mcg

200mcg/0.4 mL

ATTENTION: Enclosed medication guide is required for each patient. For more copies see aranesp.com or call 1-800-77AMGEN.

Store at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F).

Do Not Freeze or Shake. Protect from Light.

Rx Only

image of 200 mcg/0.4 mL package label


PREFILLED SYRINGE, 300 MCG

Single Use Prefilled Syringes with 27 Gauge Needles

1 x 300 mcg/0.6 mL Prefilled Syringes

Aranesp® SingleJect®

(darbepoetin alfa)

recombinant

Albumin Free

300 mcg

300mcg/0.6 mL

ATTENTION: Enclosed medication guide is required for each patient. For more copies see aranesp.com or call 1-800-77AMGEN.

Store at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F).

Do Not Freeze or Shake. Protect from Light.

Rx Only

image of 300 mcg/0.6 mL package label


PREFILLED SYRINGE, 500 MCG

Single Use Prefilled Syringes with 27 Gauge Needles

1 x 500 mcg/1 mL Prefilled Syringes

Aranesp® SingleJect®

(darbepoetin alfa)

recombinant

Albumin Free

500 mcg

500mcg/1 mL

ATTENTION: Enclosed medication guide is required for each patient. For more copies see aranesp.com or call 1-800-77AMGEN.

Store at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F).

Do Not Freeze or Shake. Protect from Light.

Rx Only

image of 500 cmg/1 mL package label


ARANESP 
darbepoetin alfa injection, solution
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:54868-5428(NDC:55513-028-01)
Route of Administration INTRAVENOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
DARBEPOETIN ALFA (DARBEPOETIN ALFA) DARBEPOETIN ALFA 200 ug  in 0.4 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
POLYSORBATE 80 0.05 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM CHLORIDE 8.18 mg  in 1 mL
WATER  
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, DIBASIC ANHYDROUS 0.66 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC, MONOHYDRATE 2.12 mg  in 1 mL
Product Characteristics
Color      Score     
Shape Size
Flavor Imprint Code
Contains     
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:54868-5428-0 1 BLISTER PACK ( BLISTER PACK) in 1 PACKAGE contains a BLISTER PACK
1 1 SYRINGE ( SYRINGE) in 1 BLISTER PACK This package is contained within the PACKAGE (54868-5428-0) and contains a SYRINGE
1 0.4 mL in 1 SYRINGE This package is contained within a BLISTER PACK and a PACKAGE (54868-5428-0)

Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
BLA BLA103951 09/13/2006

ARANESP 
darbepoetin alfa injection, solution
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:54868-5429(NDC:55513-111-01)
Route of Administration INTRAVENOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
DARBEPOETIN ALFA (DARBEPOETIN ALFA) DARBEPOETIN ALFA 300 ug  in 0.6 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
POLYSORBATE 80 0.05 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM CHLORIDE 8.18 mg  in 1 mL
WATER  
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, DIBASIC ANHYDROUS 0.66 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC, MONOHYDRATE 2.12 mg  in 1 mL
Product Characteristics
Color      Score     
Shape Size
Flavor Imprint Code
Contains     
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:54868-5429-0 1 BLISTER PACK ( BLISTER PACK) in 1 PACKAGE contains a BLISTER PACK
1 1 SYRINGE ( SYRINGE) in 1 BLISTER PACK This package is contained within the PACKAGE (54868-5429-0) and contains a SYRINGE
1 0.6 mL in 1 SYRINGE This package is contained within a BLISTER PACK and a PACKAGE (54868-5429-0)

Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
BLA BLA103951 03/20/2008

ARANESP 
darbepoetin alfa injection, solution
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:54868-5867(NDC:55513-032-01)
Route of Administration INTRAVENOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS DEA Schedule     
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
DARBEPOETIN ALFA (DARBEPOETIN ALFA) DARBEPOETIN ALFA 500 ug  in 1 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
POLYSORBATE 80 0.05 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM CHLORIDE 8.18 mg  in 1 mL
WATER  
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, DIBASIC ANHYDROUS 0.66 mg  in 1 mL
SODIUM PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC, MONOHYDRATE 2.12 mg  in 1 mL
Product Characteristics
Color      Score     
Shape Size
Flavor Imprint Code
Contains     
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:54868-5867-0 1 BLISTER PACK ( BLISTER PACK) in 1 PACKAGE contains a BLISTER PACK
1 1 SYRINGE ( SYRINGE) in 1 BLISTER PACK This package is contained within the PACKAGE (54868-5867-0) and contains a SYRINGE
1 1 mL in 1 SYRINGE This package is contained within a BLISTER PACK and a PACKAGE (54868-5867-0)

Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
BLA BLA103951 03/20/2008

Labeler - Physicians Total Care, Inc. (194123980)
Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
Physicians Total Care, Inc. 194123980 relabel

Revised: 11/2010 Physicians Total Care, Inc.



Source: http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov
Reproduced with permission of U.S. National Library of Medicine


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